Northern Forest

The Northern Forest sprawls over the northeast United States, from the Adirondack Mountains in New York all the way up to the northern woods of Maine.

In the Northern Forest, you’ll find world-class recreation set amongst deep woods and bird-filled wetlands. But these lands are at risk. The Wilderness Society is working to protect the Northern Forest from threats like climate change and development.

Why the Northern Forest

The Northern Forest is a land where sugar maples thrive, moose and lynx roam, spruce-fir forests teem with migratory songbirds and humans continue to enjoy age-old connections to the land. Generations of local communities have enjoyed the economic, recreational and health benefits the Northern Forest provides. At Wilderness, we're working to keep it that way.

Stories from the Northern Forest

The Northern Forest is home to thousands of people that care about wild places, and millions more that visit each year.  Here are some of their stories.

Experience the Northern Forest

With forests crawling with deer, moose, black bear and other wildlife, the Northern Forest is a wildlife watcher’s dream come true. Throw in world class hiking, camping and fishing and you’ve got one of the most popular wild places in America.

Focus areas

The Northern Forest stretches from the tip of northern Maine to the Adirondacks in New York. Within the heart of the Northern Forest landscape we work to protect several sensitive wildlands.

Other campaigns

In addition to our focus areas, we also work to protect other areas of New England, as well as identify ways for our wild places to cope with climate change.

Help protect the Northern Forest

We work with numerous partners to build political and public awareness of the Northern Forest. Help us continue to protect this special area for future generations.

Make a donation to help protect the Northern Forest.

  • For this report, The Wilderness Society reviewed data from more than 16,000 parcels auctioned off by the state. The analysis details more than a century of land sales that have privatized and closed off an amount of once-accessible lands nearly the size of the entire Sawtooth National Forest. Parcels often end up in the hands of some of Idaho’s biggest industries, while others have been turned into gravel pits, strip malls and even exclusive private fishing retreats and lakeshore hideaways for those wealthy enough to buy them.

  • Sample Letter to IRA Adminstrator DOC

  • In this report, we provide the policy framework for designating ORV trails and areas on federal lands, along with a series of recommendations based on recent case law and ten case studies from the Forest Service, BLM, and National Park Service that demonstrate both agency failures to comply with the executive order minimization criteria and good planning practices that could be incorporated into a model for application of the criteria.