Other California Wilderness

The Wilderness Society runs wild land campaigns across California, from the tule elk herds of Berryessa Snow Mountain to the rocky vistas of San Diego county.

We are working to protect rare California wild lands like old growth forests, volcanic cliffs, pristine river gorges, rocky spires and wildflower meadows. Preserving these beautiful places also protects wildlife habitat, enhances recreation and expands wilderness for generations of visitors.

In the last decade, The Wilderness Society and our partners have permanently protected more than one million acres of California’s wilderness. Now we are focused on wild land campaigns that extend across the state.

Berryessa Snow Mountain

Less than 100 miles from the Bay Area and Sacramento, this area is filled with meadows, clear creeks and snow fields. Its rich biodiversity includes wild tule elk, osprey and river otter.


We’re working to upgrade this national monument to a national park. Near the central coast town of Soledad, it is a volcanic wonderland of spires, caves and California condors.

Bodie Hills

Home to Bodie ghost town, this Eastern Sierra gem is dotted with aspen groves, Sierra views and high plateaus. Visitors can observe pronghorn antelope and greater sage-grouse. 

Northern San Diego County

Pristine river canyons and peaceful rocky vistas dot Agua Tibia and Beauty Mountain. Our goal is to complete wilderness protections here adjacent to Riverside County.

  • Jennifer Dickson

    According to the agency, this is the first time the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) Farmington Field Office and the Bureau of Indian Affairs’ (BIA) Navajo Regional Office will jointly conduct an analysis of management in the area that covers both public and tribal lands.  

    The following are statements in response to the announcement:

  • Anastasia Greene

    The We Can’t Wait report shows how outdated leasing guidelines, which cost taxpayers $62 million each year and create mounting environmental threats and cleanup costs, require immediate action. The report explores how modernizing the leasing program would safeguard the value of our public lands for generations to come.

  • Jennifer Dickson

    The plan is part of the highly controversial Gasco Natural Gas Development Project, which the Bureau of Land Management approved in 2012. That decision initially approved nearly 1,300 new oil and gas wells in Utah’s greater Desolation Canyon region. This 16-well project was one of the first site-specific authorizations to follow.