Other California Wilderness

The Wilderness Society runs wild land campaigns across California, from the tule elk herds of Berryessa Snow Mountain to the rocky vistas of San Diego county.

We are working to protect rare California wild lands like old growth forests, volcanic cliffs, pristine river gorges, rocky spires and wildflower meadows. Preserving these beautiful places also protects wildlife habitat, enhances recreation and expands wilderness for generations of visitors.

In the last decade, The Wilderness Society and our partners have permanently protected more than one million acres of California’s wilderness. Now we are focused on wild land campaigns that extend across the state.

Berryessa Snow Mountain

Less than 100 miles from the Bay Area and Sacramento, this area is filled with meadows, clear creeks and snow fields. Its rich biodiversity includes wild tule elk, osprey and river otter.

Pinnacles

We’re working to upgrade this national monument to a national park. Near the central coast town of Soledad, it is a volcanic wonderland of spires, caves and California condors.

Bodie Hills

Home to Bodie ghost town, this Eastern Sierra gem is dotted with aspen groves, Sierra views and high plateaus. Visitors can observe pronghorn antelope and greater sage-grouse. 

Northern San Diego County

Pristine river canyons and peaceful rocky vistas dot Agua Tibia and Beauty Mountain. Our goal is to complete wilderness protections here adjacent to Riverside County.

  • Michael Reinemer

    Rather than using taxpayer dollars, the program’s funds come from a small slice of royalties from oil and gas leases in publicly owned offshore waters. 

    The 2017 budget would invest $900 million for conservation and recreation projects, which is the annual amount authorized by the 1964 bill that created this popular program. However, actual funding approved by Congress has traditionally fallen far short of that amount. 

    Alan Rowsome at The Wilderness Society commented:

  • Anonymous

    “The proposed guidelines from the Bureau of Land Management governing natural gas waste are a huge step forward toward ensuring public resources on federal lands are used for Americans’ benefit, and not wasted.

    “For too long, oil and gas companies have been able to vent and flare unlimited quantities of natural gas and ignore massive leaks from outdated infrastructure. These unregulated actions have immense consequences for American taxpayers, who lose out on more than $330 million annually from gas that is not being sold.

  • Jennifer Dickson

    The 2016 Utah Public Lands Initiative (PLI) draft released by Utah Representative Rob Bishop fails to provide adequate protections for scenic public lands in the state, would undermine bedrock environmental laws and threatens to despoil key public lands.