Other California Wilderness

The Wilderness Society runs wild land campaigns across California, from the tule elk herds of Berryessa Snow Mountain to the rocky vistas of San Diego county.

We are working to protect rare California wild lands like old growth forests, volcanic cliffs, pristine river gorges, rocky spires and wildflower meadows. Preserving these beautiful places also protects wildlife habitat, enhances recreation and expands wilderness for generations of visitors.

In the last decade, The Wilderness Society and our partners have permanently protected more than one million acres of California’s wilderness. Now we are focused on wild land campaigns that extend across the state.

Berryessa Snow Mountain

Less than 100 miles from the Bay Area and Sacramento, this area is filled with meadows, clear creeks and snow fields. Its rich biodiversity includes wild tule elk, osprey and river otter.

Pinnacles

We’re working to upgrade this national monument to a national park. Near the central coast town of Soledad, it is a volcanic wonderland of spires, caves and California condors.

Bodie Hills

Home to Bodie ghost town, this Eastern Sierra gem is dotted with aspen groves, Sierra views and high plateaus. Visitors can observe pronghorn antelope and sage grouse. 

Southern Los Padres forest

With peaks that soar more than 8,800 feet above the Pacific and Santa Barbara, this lush forest and its creeks provide habitat for hundreds of animals including the endangered California condor.

Northern San Diego County

Pristine river canyons and peaceful rocky vistas dot Agua Tibia and Beauty Mountain. Our goal is to complete wilderness protections here adjacent to Riverside County.

  • cate tanenbaum

    Wilderness Society applauds House for moving beyond ‘gridlock’ but says new amendments lead legislation astray

    The Wilderness Society today praised the House Natural Resources Comamittee for advancing Wilderness designations for Washington state and Nevada but worries House legislation departs too significantly from more locally supported counterpart bills in the Senate. 

  • Neil Shader

    The following statement can be attributed to Chase Huntley, senior government relation director for The Wilderness Society. Chase was invited to testify before the House Natural Resources Committee Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources on H.R. 596 and H.R. 1363.

  • Neil Shader

    The first is the “Advancing Conservation and Education Act of 2014,” from Rep. Rob Bishop (Utah) and Rep. Peter DeFazio (Oregon), which would expedite transfers of land between states and federal agencies.