Other California Wilderness

The Wilderness Society runs wild land campaigns across California, from the tule elk herds of Berryessa Snow Mountain to the rocky vistas of San Diego county.

We are working to protect rare California wild lands like old growth forests, volcanic cliffs, pristine river gorges, rocky spires and wildflower meadows. Preserving these beautiful places also protects wildlife habitat, enhances recreation and expands wilderness for generations of visitors.

In the last decade, The Wilderness Society and our partners have permanently protected more than one million acres of California’s wilderness. Now we are focused on wild land campaigns that extend across the state.

Berryessa Snow Mountain

Less than 100 miles from the Bay Area and Sacramento, this area is filled with meadows, clear creeks and snow fields. Its rich biodiversity includes wild tule elk, osprey and river otter.

Pinnacles

We’re working to upgrade this national monument to a national park. Near the central coast town of Soledad, it is a volcanic wonderland of spires, caves and California condors.

Bodie Hills

Home to Bodie ghost town, this Eastern Sierra gem is dotted with aspen groves, Sierra views and high plateaus. Visitors can observe pronghorn antelope and greater sage-grouse. 

Northern San Diego County

Pristine river canyons and peaceful rocky vistas dot Agua Tibia and Beauty Mountain. Our goal is to complete wilderness protections here adjacent to Riverside County.

  • The 114th Congress faces a multitude of environmental challenges. The Wilderness Society is working the halls of power to make sure that America's wild places are part of the legislative agenda, and to make sure that lawmakers and staff are hearing both sides of the issues.

  • Every year, a coalition of conservation and environmental groups produce a report to help Congress as it debates the federal budget for the year. This report, has typically been to referred to as the "Green Budget." This year, it illustrates the importance of reinvesting in conservation and natural resources programs for Fiscal Year 2016 and outlines dozens of examples of programs that have been shortchanged in recent years. 

  • 2014 Audited Financial Statements