Other campaigns in Alaska

There is no time to waste and the scale of the threat is huge. Global warming is already affecting Alaska and will do so for decades to come.

Alaska is warming at more than twice the rate of the rest of the United States, and projections indicate Alaska will experience the greatest temperature increases in all of the Arctic.

Rising temperatures threaten permafrost and the stability of Alaska’s infrastructure and habitat. Melting land and sea ice has already caused sea levels to rise four to eight inches in some regions. Communities are already threatened by rising water and the erosion of coastlines.

Coping with Arctic climate change

Scientists at The Wilderness Society are studying how climate change will affect wildlife and habitat in Alaska and the Arctic. We are working with land-management agencies to help them adapt to change and invest in the protection of natural resources.

This will allow scientists, engineers and others to:

  • Repair damaged watersheds to ensure clean water for communities and fish
  • Manage migration corridors for caribou and other species to ensure their survival
  • Monitor wildlife, habitat and climate
  • Develop the best responses to climate change

This work will create new jobs and provide new skills and income to Alaskans and their families, helping revitalize economies.

  • Alex Thompson

    Today, the House Natural Resources Committee will begin marking up the Public Land Renewable Energy Development Act of 2017 (H.R. 825).

    The bipartisan legislation would create priority areas for renewable energy development on public lands, ensuring more certainty and efficiency for projects, while limiting environmental and community impacts. The bill would also create a conservation fund to reinvest revenue from renewable energy projects back into affected communities, as well as into fish and wildlife habitat conservation and recreation on public lands.

  • Michael Reinemer

    Statement on Interior Department recommendation on Canyons of the Ancients National Monument, July 21, 2017

    The following statement is from Scott Miller, Southwest Senior Regional Director for the Wilderness Society:

  • Tim Woody

    By passing H.R. 218 today, the U.S. House of Representatives set a dangerous precedent, approving construction of a destructive, unnecessary road through protected wilderness in the vital Izembek National Wildlife Refuge in the Alaska Peninsula.  

    This bill undermines bedrock conservation laws including the 1964 Wilderness Act, which prevents road building in designated wilderness, and the National Environmental Policy Act, which guarantees a process for environmental review of federal decisions, including participation by citizens and other stakeholders.