Other campaigns in Alaska

There is no time to waste and the scale of the threat is huge. Global warming is already affecting Alaska and will do so for decades to come.

Alaska is warming at more than twice the rate of the rest of the United States, and projections indicate Alaska will experience the greatest temperature increases in all of the Arctic.

Rising temperatures threaten permafrost and the stability of Alaska’s infrastructure and habitat. Melting land and sea ice has already caused sea levels to rise four to eight inches in some regions. Communities are already threatened by rising water and the erosion of coastlines.

Coping with Arctic climate change

Scientists at The Wilderness Society are studying how climate change will affect wildlife and habitat in Alaska and the Arctic. We are working with land-management agencies to help them adapt to change and invest in the protection of natural resources.

This will allow scientists, engineers and others to:

  • Repair damaged watersheds to ensure clean water for communities and fish
  • Manage migration corridors for caribou and other species to ensure their survival
  • Monitor wildlife, habitat and climate
  • Develop the best responses to climate change

This work will create new jobs and provide new skills and income to Alaskans and their families, helping revitalize economies.

  • Caroline Mosley
    “Today’s decision to halt the Dakota Access Pipeline and to call for a full environmental review of alternative routes is welcome and positive news,” said Jamie Williams, president of The Wilderness Society. “The Army Corps of Engineers is right to recognize that Native nations were not meaningfully consulted on a project with such high risks to their sovereign lands and drinking water.
     
  • Tyler North

    The Bureau of Land Management has released its final version of its Planning 2.0 regulation, which has helped shape progress the BLM has made in its land use planning. The Wilderness Society applauds this effort and has already seen examples of smart planning in effect.

  • Michael Reinemer

    Yesterday, the U.S. Senate unanimously passed H.R. 4665, Outdoor Recreation’s Economic Contributions (REC) Act, which President Obama is expected to sign into law.

    This bill would ensure that the outdoor recreation economy is measured by the federal government and accounted for as part of the national gross domestic product (GDP).  The House of Representatives passed the bill earlier this month.