Other campaigns in Alaska

There is no time to waste and the scale of the threat is huge. Global warming is already affecting Alaska and will do so for decades to come.

Alaska is warming at more than twice the rate of the rest of the United States, and projections indicate Alaska will experience the greatest temperature increases in all of the Arctic.

Rising temperatures threaten permafrost and the stability of Alaska’s infrastructure and habitat. Melting land and sea ice has already caused sea levels to rise four to eight inches in some regions. Communities are already threatened by rising water and the erosion of coastlines.

Coping with Arctic climate change

Scientists at The Wilderness Society are studying how climate change will affect wildlife and habitat in Alaska and the Arctic. We are working with land-management agencies to help them adapt to change and invest in the protection of natural resources.

This will allow scientists, engineers and others to:

  • Repair damaged watersheds to ensure clean water for communities and fish
  • Manage migration corridors for caribou and other species to ensure their survival
  • Monitor wildlife, habitat and climate
  • Develop the best responses to climate change

This work will create new jobs and provide new skills and income to Alaskans and their families, helping revitalize economies.

  • Michael Reinemer

    The Wilderness Society praises Congress for passing the Hill Creek Cultural Preservation and Energy Development Act (H.R. 356 / S. 27). The legislation provides for the exchange of roughly 20,000 acres of Utah’s mineral rights from ecologically and culturally sensitive lands in the Desolation Canyon region of the Uintah and Ouray Reservation for federal mineral rights in another part of the reservation.

  • Michael Reinemer

    The draft House Interior and Environment Appropriations bill released today is a clear improvement from previous years, though it still misses the mark on several key conservation, climate and public lands needs and is laden with numerous policy provisions or “riders” that have no place in the appropriations process.

  • Michael Reinemer

    On Wednesday, The Wilderness Society presented lifetime conservation achievement awards to Representatives George Miller, Jim Moran and Rush Holt, who collectively represent 80 years of support for conservation of some of America’s most stunning landscapes and protection of the country’s clean air and water.  All three members of Congress have announced their plans to retire at the end of the current session.

    Rep. George Miller (California – 11th District)