Other campaigns in Alaska

There is no time to waste and the scale of the threat is huge. Global warming is already affecting Alaska and will do so for decades to come.

Alaska is warming at more than twice the rate of the rest of the United States, and projections indicate Alaska will experience the greatest temperature increases in all of the Arctic.

Rising temperatures threaten permafrost and the stability of Alaska’s infrastructure and habitat. Melting land and sea ice has already caused sea levels to rise four to eight inches in some regions. Communities are already threatened by rising water and the erosion of coastlines.

Coping with Arctic climate change

Scientists at The Wilderness Society are studying how climate change will affect wildlife and habitat in Alaska and the Arctic. We are working with land-management agencies to help them adapt to change and invest in the protection of natural resources.

This will allow scientists, engineers and others to:

  • Repair damaged watersheds to ensure clean water for communities and fish
  • Manage migration corridors for caribou and other species to ensure their survival
  • Monitor wildlife, habitat and climate
  • Develop the best responses to climate change

This work will create new jobs and provide new skills and income to Alaskans and their families, helping revitalize economies.

  • Michael Reinemer

    On Bureau of Land Management (BLM) lands and National Forests, the agencies are mismanaging the use of off-road vehicles (ORVs) such as dirt bikes, snowmobiles, and all-terrain vehicles, resulting in unnecessary damage to watersheds and wildlife, and conflict with other recreationists. This is in spite of a long-standing legal obligation dating back to the 1970s that requires federal land agencies to minimize such damage and conflict.

  • Michael Reinemer

    Development of natural areas in the United States, coupled with expected changes in climate, have increased the importance of migration corridors that connect protected natural areas. Large, connected wild lands reduce the isolation of animal and plant populations and allow for migration and movement that can help preserve populations of wild species and enhance genetic and ecosystem diversity. 

  • Sarah Graddy

    An analysis of more than 8,700 low-producing natural gas wells in two counties in the San Juan Basin, San Juan and Rio Arriba, determined that BLM’s rule will have little to no negative impact on these marginal wells.

    The results of the study indicate that the new rule—which aims to reduce waste from venting, flaring and leaks from oil and gas operations on public and tribal lands—will actually increase overall production and royalties paid to support vital services in the state of New Mexico.