Other campaigns in Alaska

There is no time to waste and the scale of the threat is huge. Global warming is already affecting Alaska and will do so for decades to come.

Alaska is warming at more than twice the rate of the rest of the United States, and projections indicate Alaska will experience the greatest temperature increases in all of the Arctic.

Rising temperatures threaten permafrost and the stability of Alaska’s infrastructure and habitat. Melting land and sea ice has already caused sea levels to rise four to eight inches in some regions. Communities are already threatened by rising water and the erosion of coastlines.

Coping with Arctic climate change

Scientists at The Wilderness Society are studying how climate change will affect wildlife and habitat in Alaska and the Arctic. We are working with land-management agencies to help them adapt to change and invest in the protection of natural resources.

This will allow scientists, engineers and others to:

  • Repair damaged watersheds to ensure clean water for communities and fish
  • Manage migration corridors for caribou and other species to ensure their survival
  • Monitor wildlife, habitat and climate
  • Develop the best responses to climate change

This work will create new jobs and provide new skills and income to Alaskans and their families, helping revitalize economies.

  • Anastasia Greene

    On Monday, September 26, the Colorado Bureau of Land Management state office announced that it will be pursuing a master leasing plan in Southwest Colorado. The statement comes after the agency engaged in an unprecedented public outreach campaign that consisted of a series of public meetings and the formation of a public working group that resulted in the submission of hundreds of comments to the local Tres Rios field office.

  • Michael Reinemer

    Today the House of Representatives approved H.R. 845, the National Forest System Trails Stewardship Act by Representatives Cynthia Lummis (R-WY) and Tim Walz (D-MN). The legislation would keep more trails across the nation open and accessible by expanding the use of volunteer and partner organizations and providing increased focus on a handful of priority areas around the country.

  • Michael Reinemer

    With very few legislative days left in the 114th Congress, this bill has no chance of being adopted and would do too little to protect wild, cultural and historic lands, including the critically important Bears Ears area.