Other Campaigns in California

From northern majestic forests to southern desert vistas, we are working across California to protect wildlands.

Saving wildlands protects:

  • Wildlife habitat
  • Recreation
  • Water supplies
  • Tourism

Statewide campaigns to save wildlands

In the last decade, The Wilderness Society and our partners have permanently protected more than one million acres of California’s wilderness. Today, we are focused on 10 statewide campaigns, in places like Pinnacles National Monument and Bodie Hills, to protect more of California's shrinking wilderness.

Reducing climate change impacts on wildlands

As climate change harms California’s wildlands, it will also impact  its residents and economy. To reduce the threats of global warming, we are working on:

  • Conservation policies to buffer wildlands from climate change
  • Michael Reinemer

    Statement on Interior Department recommendation on Canyons of the Ancients National Monument, July 21, 2017

    The following statement is from Scott Miller, Southwest Senior Regional Director for the Wilderness Society:

  • Tim Woody

    By passing H.R. 218 today, the U.S. House of Representatives set a dangerous precedent, approving construction of a destructive, unnecessary road through protected wilderness in the vital Izembek National Wildlife Refuge in the Alaska Peninsula.  

    This bill undermines bedrock conservation laws including the 1964 Wilderness Act, which prevents road building in designated wilderness, and the National Environmental Policy Act, which guarantees a process for environmental review of federal decisions, including participation by citizens and other stakeholders. 

  • Alex Thompson

    Today the U.S. Senate held a procedural vote for Interior’s deputy secretary nomination of David Bernhardt.

    The former California lobbyist and high-ranking staffer at Interior under President George W. Bush has a longstanding history with oil and gas companies, having pushed for the removal of impediments to drilling in land use plans and advancing energy development in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge.

    The Wilderness Society issued the following statement from Melyssa Watson, vice president for conservation: