Other Campaigns in the Southern Appalachians

The Southern Appalachians are among the most iconic wild places in America. At Wilderness, we're working to keep them wild.

We work with local residents and partners to maintain hiking and biking trails in the wilderness areas in the Southern Appalachians. We’re also working with private landowners to help conserve interconnected forests on public and private lands.

Our work on the ground helps to keep the forests and wilderness areas of the Southern Appalachians accessible, while still protecting their wild aspects.

Southern Appalachian Wilderness Stewards

The Southern Appalachian Wilderness Stewards are dedicated to maintaining trails in the designated Wilderness areas in the Southeast. Learn more and get involved

Slick Rock to Shining Rock

The forests of the Great Smoky Mountains extend beyond National Forest boundaries. Learn how we’re working with private landowners.

  • Anastasia Greene

    The future of more than 50 million acres of Bureau of Land Management Land could include more conservation measures based on plans announced by Interior Secretary Sally Jewell today.  When adopted and implemented, the federal plans for managing the conservation of Greater Sage-Grouse could complement the broad number of efforts already underway across the West and highlight a commitment to conservation that is needed from the Interior Department.

  • Michael Reinemer

    Citing some of “the most beautiful and iconic landscapes on earth” in Teton County’s backyard, the board of commissioners Tuesday morning unanimously passed a resolution that “opposes any and all efforts by the State of Wyoming to obtain the wholesale transfer of federal lands in Wyoming” to the state. In January, Sweetwater County filed a letter with the state legislature stating similar opposition to measures that would turn over federal public lands—such as parks, wilderness, and national forests—to state jurisdiction and management.

  • Tim Woody

    In spite of Royal Dutch Shell’s disastrous performance during the 2012 Arctic Ocean drilling season, the federal Bureau of Ocean Energy Management today conditionally approved the company’s 2015 exploration plan, which provides even fewer safeguards for the Chukchi Sea and its sensitive coastline than Shell had in place three years ago. Shell also plans to bring a different rig operated by a new contractor to the Arctic Ocean in 2015, which could result in unexpected transport and drilling problems.