Other Places We Work

In addition to our seven landscapes, we work to protect wilderness in New Mexico, Idaho and Greater Yellowstone.

We work in these areas to designate wilderness and monuments, restore and protect national forests and to ensure wildlands remain protected for generations to come.

Greater Yellowstone

Greater Yellowstone is one of the last large, intact networks of wildlands in the United States. But all of its natural treasures are threatened by expanding energy development and growing populations. 

Idaho

Idaho is home to some of the most rugged and remote wildlands in the United States. The state's diverse wildlife and plant species are among the rarest in the American west.

New Mexico

New Mexico boasts some of the nation’s most unique wildlands and natural landmarks — from the snowy peaks of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains to the wind-tossed grasses of Otero Mesa.

  • cate tanenbaum

    Wilderness Society applauds House for moving beyond ‘gridlock’ but says new amendments lead legislation astray

    The Wilderness Society today praised the House Natural Resources Comamittee for advancing Wilderness designations for Washington state and Nevada but worries House legislation departs too significantly from more locally supported counterpart bills in the Senate. 

  • Neil Shader

    The following statement can be attributed to Chase Huntley, senior government relation director for The Wilderness Society. Chase was invited to testify before the House Natural Resources Committee Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources on H.R. 596 and H.R. 1363.

  • Neil Shader

    The first is the “Advancing Conservation and Education Act of 2014,” from Rep. Rob Bishop (Utah) and Rep. Peter DeFazio (Oregon), which would expedite transfers of land between states and federal agencies.