Other Places We Work

In addition to our seven landscapes, we work to protect wilderness in New Mexico, Idaho and Greater Yellowstone.

We work in these areas to designate wilderness and monuments, restore and protect national forests and to ensure wildlands remain protected for generations to come.

Greater Yellowstone

Greater Yellowstone is one of the last large, intact networks of wildlands in the United States. But all of its natural treasures are threatened by expanding energy development and growing populations. 

Idaho

Idaho is home to some of the most rugged and remote wildlands in the United States. The state's diverse wildlife and plant species are among the rarest in the American west.

New Mexico

New Mexico boasts some of the nation’s most unique wildlands and natural landmarks — from the snowy peaks of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains to the wind-tossed grasses of Otero Mesa.

  • Michael Reinemer

    The following statement is from Sally Miller, senior regional conservation representative with The Wilderness Society, regarding Representative Paul Cook’s introduction of legislation to create the Alabama Hills National Scenic Area and include it in the Bureau of Land Management’s system of National Conservation Lands:

  • Michael Reinemer

    Senators Mike Crapo, R-Idaho, and Ron Wyden, D-Ore., introduced the bill along with Republican Senators James Risch of Idaho, Cory Gardner of Colorado and Steve Daines of Montana as well as Democratic Senators Michael Bennet of Colorado, Tammy Baldwin of Wisconsin and Maria Cantwell of Washington.

    The bill would change how the federal government budgets for the suppression of wildfire disasters, to make it similar to the way other disasters are funded.

  • Anonymous

    “The amendment offered by Senator Fischer to the Keystone XL Pipeline legislation proposes to create major roadblocks for popular local programs like the Land and Water Conservation Fund that secures access to popular public lands for sportsmen, recreationists and all Americans.