Other Places We Work

In addition to our seven landscapes, we work to protect wilderness in New Mexico, Idaho and Greater Yellowstone.

We work in these areas to designate wilderness and monuments, restore and protect national forests and to ensure wildlands remain protected for generations to come.

Greater Yellowstone

Greater Yellowstone is one of the last large, intact networks of wildlands in the United States. But all of its natural treasures are threatened by expanding energy development and growing populations. 

Idaho

Idaho is home to some of the most rugged and remote wildlands in the United States. The state's diverse wildlife and plant species are among the rarest in the American west.

New Mexico

New Mexico boasts some of the nation’s most unique wildlands and natural landmarks — from the snowy peaks of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains to the wind-tossed grasses of Otero Mesa.

  • Testimony delivered by The Wilderness Society's Chase Huntley to the House Natural Resources Committee Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources

  • A letter to Members of the House of Representatives urging them to oppose HR 4899, a bill that would undermine important wildland protections and force drilling in pristine areas of the National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska

  • Every year, a coalition of conservation and environmental groups produce a report to help Congress as it debates the federal budget for the year. This report, has typically been to referred to as the "Green Budget." This year, it is titled "Green Investments," and it illustrates the importance of reinvesting in conservation and natural resources programs for Fiscal Year 2015 by looking at some of the effects of recent budget cuts.