Other Ways to Give

You can help protect wilderness for generations to come by giving to The Wilderness Society.

 

At The Wilderness Society, we are working to complete a system of protected wildlands in the United States and we need your help.

Your tax-deductible gift will help us continue this important land conservation work. With your gift, you are leaving behind a legacy of wilderness support and ensuring that American wildlands thrive for generations to come

Giving Through Your Will

You can support The Wilderness Society by leaving a gift through your will or estate plan.

Workplace Giving

Making a donation through payroll deduction is one of the easiest and cost-efficient ways to help protect wilderness.

Giving Stock

Gifts of stocks, bonds or mutual funds appreciated in value may be especially attractive to you under the current tax laws.

Ready to give stock? See our transfer instructions (PDF).

Contribute Mutual Fund Shares

Much like a gift of stock, mutual funds are another way that you can make a larger gift than you might ordinarily be able to give – simply by giving shares of mutual funds you've owned for more than one year. 

Ready to give a gift of mutual fund shares today? Download delivery information about donating mutual fund shares.

Personal Property

Donate books, artwork or equipment and secure an income tax deduction.

Endowment Funds

The Wilderness Society is committed to ensuring the long term protection of our public lands through the development and management of Endowment Funds. Each year, a percentage of the endowment’s interest is used to fund a designated program. By contributing to a Wilderness Society Endowment Fund you are investing in the future of America’s public lands.

For more information, please contact our staff at giftplanning@tws.org or call 1-888-736-4897

 

  • Michael Reinemer

    The 2018 Senate Interior Appropriations bill would eliminate protection for roadless areas in Southeast Alaska’s Tongass National Forest (our nation’s largest national forest) and the spectacular Chugach National Forest near Anchorage. The 2001 Roadless Area Conservation Rule, one of the most popular and successful conservation measures in US history, protected the 58.5 million acres of America’s roadless national forests from logging and roadbuilding.

  • Michael Reinemer

    TO:            Editorial Writers, Reporters and Columnists                           

    FROM:    The Wilderness Society  

    RE:           Legislative Attack on the 2001 Roadless Area Conservation Rule

    DATE:      November 21, 2017 

  • Tim Woody