Other Ways to Give

You can help protect wilderness for generations to come by giving to The Wilderness Society.

 

At The Wilderness Society, we are working to complete a system of protected wildlands in the United States and we need your help.

Your tax-deductible gift will help us continue this important land conservation work. With your gift, you are leaving behind a legacy of wilderness support and ensuring that American wildlands thrive for generations to come

Giving Through Your Will

You can support The Wilderness Society by leaving a gift through your will or estate plan.

Workplace Giving

Making a donation through payroll deduction is one of the easiest and cost-efficient ways to help protect wilderness.

Giving Stock

Gifts of stocks, bonds or mutual funds appreciated in value may be especially attractive to you under the current tax laws.

Ready to give stock? See our transfer instructions.

Contribute Mutual Fund Shares

Much like a gift of stock, mutual funds are another way that you can make a larger gift than you might ordinarily be able to give – simply by giving shares of mutual funds you've owned for more than one year. 

Ready to give a gift of mutual fund shares today? Download delivery information about donating mutual fund shares.

Personal Property

Donate books, artwork or equipment and secure an income tax deduction.

Endowment Funds

The Wilderness Society is committed to ensuring the long term protection of our public lands through the development and management of Endowment Funds. Each year, a percentage of the endowment’s interest is used to fund a designated program. By contributing to a Wilderness Society Endowment Fund you are investing in the future of America’s public lands.

For more information, please contact our staff at  legacygifts@tws.org or call 888-736-4897

 

  • Anastasia Greene

    “We are disappointed to see that the President-elect has appointed a climate science skeptic who has pledged to rollback greenhouse gas reduction measures. Our nation faces unprecedented challenges from human-caused climate change, including our national parks and communities most vulnerable to drought, flooding and other effects.

  • Michael Reinemer

    As leaders of the U.S. environmental movement, we are mothers and fathers, daughters and sons, white, black, Latino, Asian, Native American, of many creeds, faiths and religions. We come from diverse backgrounds and near infinite preferences and beliefs. But above all, we are concerned individuals and concerned members of the human race.

  • Michael Reinemer
    “Today’s decision to halt the Dakota Access Pipeline and to call for a full environmental review of alternative routes is welcome and positive news,” said Jamie Williams, president of The Wilderness Society. “The Army Corps of Engineers is right to recognize that Native nations were not meaningfully consulted on a project with such high risks to their sovereign lands and drinking water.