Other Ways to Give

You can help protect wilderness for generations to come by giving to The Wilderness Society.

 

At The Wilderness Society, we are working to complete a system of protected wildlands in the United States and we need your help.

Your tax-deductible gift will help us continue this important land conservation work. With your gift, you are leaving behind a legacy of wilderness support and ensuring that American wildlands thrive for generations to come

Giving Through Your Will

You can support The Wilderness Society by leaving a gift through your will or estate plan.

Workplace Giving

Making a donation through payroll deduction is one of the easiest and cost-efficient ways to help protect wilderness.

Giving Stock

Gifts of stocks, bonds or mutual funds appreciated in value may be especially attractive to you under the current tax laws.

Ready to give stock? See our transfer instructions.

Contribute Mutual Fund Shares

Much like a gift of stock, mutual funds are another way that you can make a larger gift than you might ordinarily be able to give – simply by giving shares of mutual funds you've owned for more than one year. 

Ready to give a gift of mutual fund shares today? Download delivery information about donating mutual fund shares.

Personal Property

Donate books, artwork or equipment and secure an income tax deduction.

Endowment Funds

The Wilderness Society is committed to ensuring the long term protection of our public lands through the development and management of Endowment Funds. Each year, a percentage of the endowment’s interest is used to fund a designated program. By contributing to a Wilderness Society Endowment Fund you are investing in the future of America’s public lands.

For more information, please contact our staff at  legacygifts@tws.org or call 888-736-4897

 

  • Michael Reinemer

    Development of natural areas in the United States, coupled with expected changes in climate, have increased the importance of migration corridors that connect protected natural areas. Large, connected wild lands reduce the isolation of animal and plant populations and allow for migration and movement that can help preserve populations of wild species and enhance genetic and ecosystem diversity. 

  • Sarah Graddy

    An analysis of more than 8,700 low-producing natural gas wells in two counties in the San Juan Basin, San Juan and Rio Arriba, determined that BLM’s rule will have little to no negative impact on these marginal wells.

    The results of the study indicate that the new rule—which aims to reduce waste from venting, flaring and leaks from oil and gas operations on public and tribal lands—will actually increase overall production and royalties paid to support vital services in the state of New Mexico.

  • Michael Reinemer

    The measure would permanently authorize the Land and Water Conservation Fund, protect two wilderness areas in New Mexico and address water supply and river restoration efforts in the Yakima Basin in Washington state.