Our Funding Priorities

Our national parks, forests, scenic rivers, wilderness areas, wildlife refuges, monuments and recreation areas rely on federal funding to remain healthy and strong.

Conservation funding comes from the federal budget, whether through the president’s budget or the House and Senate budget. The federal government designates funds for conservation as part of the annual budget and appropriations process.

Federal funding for conservation ensures the well-being of our wilderness, environment, communities and local economies. When wilderness and public land projects have adequate conservation funding, those lands continue to thrive, benefiting our lives and our communities.

At Wilderness, we work just as hard to ensure adequate federal funding for conservation projects as we do in our on-the-ground work to protect wilderness and public lands.

Green Budget

Each year a coalition of national environmental and conservation organizations prepares a “Green Budget.” The budget illustrates how we can best use federal dollars to:

  • Meet the challenges of climate change
  • Sustain our forests and wilderness areas
  • Support other critical conservation efforts

Land and Water Conservation Fund

The Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) has preserved more than five million acres of land for conservation and recreation purposes, from the Olympic National Forest in Washington to Acadia National Park in Maine. The program has provided more than $3.5 billion in state matching grants over the past 40 years.

  • Michael Reinemer

    The Wilderness Society commends the Obama Administration for making history today by quadrupling the size of the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument, now the largest protected area in the world, measuring 582,578 square miles.

  • Michael Reinemer

    The Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument will be a unit of the National Park Service and was announced on the eve of the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service, which was established on August 25, 1916.

  • Max Greenberg

    The next fiscal year starts on Oct. 1, meaning that Congress is running out of time to cobble together "must-pass" appropriations legislation that will pay for the day-to-day expenses of the federal government.

    But in what has become a sad annual commentary on some leaders' dereliction of America's conservation tradition, the process is gummed up with counterproductive “riders” that have no place in the appropriations process, and would hurt wildlands right when they sorely need our help.