Our Funding Priorities

Our national parks, forests, scenic rivers, wilderness areas, wildlife refuges, monuments and recreation areas rely on federal funding to remain healthy and strong.

Conservation funding comes from the federal budget, whether through the president’s budget or the House and Senate budget. The federal government designates funds for conservation as part of the annual budget and appropriations process.

Federal funding for conservation ensures the well-being of our wilderness, environment, communities and local economies. When wilderness and public land projects have adequate conservation funding, those lands continue to thrive, benefiting our lives and our communities.

At Wilderness, we work just as hard to ensure adequate federal funding for conservation projects as we do in our on-the-ground work to protect wilderness and public lands.

Green Budget

Each year a coalition of national environmental and conservation organizations prepares a “Green Budget.” The budget illustrates how we can best use federal dollars to:

  • Meet the challenges of climate change
  • Sustain our forests and wilderness areas
  • Support other critical conservation efforts

Land and Water Conservation Fund

The Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) has preserved more than five million acres of land for conservation and recreation purposes, from the Olympic National Forest in Washington to Acadia National Park in Maine. The program has provided more than $3.5 billion in state matching grants over the past 40 years.

  • Neil Shader

    New legislation introduced today in the House and the Senate would undermine state and federal planning efforts, nearly complete, to conserve the greater sage grouse and perpetuate uncertainty faced by all westerners, according to The Wilderness Society. The following statement can be attributed to Chase Huntley, senior government relations director for The Wilderness Society.

  • Neil Shader

    Authorization for LWCF runs out on September 30 2015.

    Today, Earth Day, the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee will hold a hearing on “reauthorization and potential reforms” to LWCF. Funded primarily by offshore oil royalties—not taxpayer dollars—the program has had strong bipartisan support since its enactment in 1964. The Wilderness Society strongly supports several bills to reauthorize LWCF including S. 890, S. 338 and H.R. 1814, now pending in Congress.

  • Neil Shader

    Proactive, cooperative conservation measures could be a model for protections across the West

    The following statement can be attributed to Nada Culver, senior director of agency policy and planning for The Wilderness Society, regarding the Department of Interior’s decision to not add the bi-state greater sage grouse population to the Endangered Species List.