Our Funding Priorities

Our national parks, forests, scenic rivers, wilderness areas, wildlife refuges, monuments and recreation areas rely on federal funding to remain healthy and strong.

Conservation funding comes from the federal budget, whether through the president’s budget or the House and Senate budget. The federal government designates funds for conservation as part of the annual budget and appropriations process.

Federal funding for conservation ensures the well-being of our wilderness, environment, communities and local economies. When wilderness and public land projects have adequate conservation funding, those lands continue to thrive, benefiting our lives and our communities.

At Wilderness, we work just as hard to ensure adequate federal funding for conservation projects as we do in our on-the-ground work to protect wilderness and public lands.

Green Budget

Each year a coalition of national environmental and conservation organizations prepares a “Green Budget.” The budget illustrates how we can best use federal dollars to:

  • Meet the challenges of climate change
  • Sustain our forests and wilderness areas
  • Support other critical conservation efforts

Land and Water Conservation Fund

The Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) has preserved more than five million acres of land for conservation and recreation purposes, from the Olympic National Forest in Washington to Acadia National Park in Maine. The program has provided more than $3.5 billion in state matching grants over the past 40 years.

  • Neil Shader

    A report on landscape-based mitigation released by the Interior Department Energy and Climate Change Task Force, “A Strategy for Improving the Mitigation Policies and Practices of The Department of the Interior,”  provides a blueprint for better protection for fish, wildlife, recreation and wild land values for the tens of millions of acres of public lands open to oil and gas and other energy development.

  • Michael Reinemer

    This weekend, veterans from around the West will be visiting the rolling, boulder-strewn landscape of the Dragoon Mountains south of Tucson to participate in a writing workshop that will guide them on skills needed to create narratives of fiction, non-fiction, or poetry that is informed both by their service experiences and the natural environment.

  • Neil Shader

    The following statement on the confirmation of Neil Kornze to be the Director of the Bureau of Land Management can be attributed to Jamie Williams, president of The Wilderness Society.