Our Funding Priorities

Our national parks, forests, scenic rivers, wilderness areas, wildlife refuges, monuments and recreation areas rely on federal funding to remain healthy and strong.

Conservation funding comes from the federal budget, whether through the president’s budget or the House and Senate budget. The federal government designates funds for conservation as part of the annual budget and appropriations process.

Federal funding for conservation ensures the well-being of our wilderness, environment, communities and local economies. When wilderness and public land projects have adequate conservation funding, those lands continue to thrive, benefiting our lives and our communities.

At Wilderness, we work just as hard to ensure adequate federal funding for conservation projects as we do in our on-the-ground work to protect wilderness and public lands.

Green Budget

Each year a coalition of national environmental and conservation organizations prepares a “Green Budget.” The budget illustrates how we can best use federal dollars to:

  • Meet the challenges of climate change
  • Sustain our forests and wilderness areas
  • Support other critical conservation efforts

Land and Water Conservation Fund

The Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) has preserved more than five million acres of land for conservation and recreation purposes, from the Olympic National Forest in Washington to Acadia National Park in Maine. The program has provided more than $3.5 billion in state matching grants over the past 40 years.

  • Michael Reinemer

    Citing some of “the most beautiful and iconic landscapes on earth” in Teton County’s backyard, the board of commissioners Tuesday morning unanimously passed a resolution that “opposes any and all efforts by the State of Wyoming to obtain the wholesale transfer of federal lands in Wyoming” to the state. In January, Sweetwater County filed a letter with the state legislature stating similar opposition to measures that would turn over federal public lands—such as parks, wilderness, and national forests—to state jurisdiction and management.

  • Tim Woody

    In spite of Royal Dutch Shell’s disastrous performance during the 2012 Arctic Ocean drilling season, the federal Bureau of Ocean Energy Management today conditionally approved the company’s 2015 exploration plan, which provides even fewer safeguards for the Chukchi Sea and its sensitive coastline than Shell had in place three years ago. Shell also plans to bring a different rig operated by a new contractor to the Arctic Ocean in 2015, which could result in unexpected transport and drilling problems.

  • Michael Reinemer

    The Wilderness Society strongly supports bipartisan legislation, the Wildfire Disaster Funding Act of 2015 (S. 235, H.R. 167), to fix a budgetary problem called “fire borrowing.”  This is a destructive cycle in which the Forest Service is forced to take funds from other forest programs when its allotted wildfire funds are used up, essentially robbing Peter to pay Paul to put out fires in our national forests.