Our Funding Priorities

Our national parks, forests, scenic rivers, wilderness areas, wildlife refuges, monuments and recreation areas rely on federal funding to remain healthy and strong.

Conservation funding comes from the federal budget, whether through the president’s budget or the House and Senate budget. The federal government designates funds for conservation as part of the annual budget and appropriations process.

Federal funding for conservation ensures the well-being of our wilderness, environment, communities and local economies. When wilderness and public land projects have adequate conservation funding, those lands continue to thrive, benefiting our lives and our communities.

At Wilderness, we work just as hard to ensure adequate federal funding for conservation projects as we do in our on-the-ground work to protect wilderness and public lands.

Green Budget

Each year a coalition of national environmental and conservation organizations prepares a “Green Budget.” The budget illustrates how we can best use federal dollars to:

  • Meet the challenges of climate change
  • Sustain our forests and wilderness areas
  • Support other critical conservation efforts

Land and Water Conservation Fund

The Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) has preserved more than five million acres of land for conservation and recreation purposes, from the Olympic National Forest in Washington to Acadia National Park in Maine. The program has provided more than $3.5 billion in state matching grants over the past 40 years.

  • For this report, The Wilderness Society reviewed data from more than 16,000 parcels auctioned off by the state. The analysis details more than a century of land sales that have privatized and closed off an amount of once-accessible lands nearly the size of the entire Sawtooth National Forest. Parcels often end up in the hands of some of Idaho’s biggest industries, while others have been turned into gravel pits, strip malls and even exclusive private fishing retreats and lakeshore hideaways for those wealthy enough to buy them.

  • Sample Letter to IRA Adminstrator DOC

  • In this report, we provide the policy framework for designating ORV trails and areas on federal lands, along with a series of recommendations based on recent case law and ten case studies from the Forest Service, BLM, and National Park Service that demonstrate both agency failures to comply with the executive order minimization criteria and good planning practices that could be incorporated into a model for application of the criteria.