Owyhee Canyonlands

The Wilderness Society has worked for eight years to protect the spectacular Owyhee Canyonlands. Now we’re working with local partners to fulfill our conservation commitments.

In 2009, we helped permanently protect the high deserts and life-giving rivers of the Owyhee Canyonlands. We are still working today to develop science-based management plans to ensure the Owyhee Canyonlands remain healthy and thriving.

Why Owyhee Canyonlands

The Owyhee Canyonlands is like no other area in the U.S. and well deserving of strong permanent protection.

We worked for eight years to get permanent protection of the Owyhee and its spectacular canyonlands. Now we’re working to ensure those safeguards stay put.

Work we’re doing

We worked for eight years to get permanent protection of the Owyhee and its spectacular canyonlands. Now we’re working to ensure those safeguards stay put. 

Our Partners

For over a decade, we have worked with groups of ranchers, conservation professionals, agricultural interests, sportsmen, outfitters and guides to care for the Owyhee Canyonlands.   

  • cate tanenbaum

    Wilderness Society applauds House for moving beyond ‘gridlock’ but says new amendments lead legislation astray

    The Wilderness Society today praised the House Natural Resources Comamittee for advancing Wilderness designations for Washington state and Nevada but worries House legislation departs too significantly from more locally supported counterpart bills in the Senate. 

  • Neil Shader

    The following statement can be attributed to Chase Huntley, senior government relation director for The Wilderness Society. Chase was invited to testify before the House Natural Resources Committee Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources on H.R. 596 and H.R. 1363.

  • Neil Shader

    The first is the “Advancing Conservation and Education Act of 2014,” from Rep. Rob Bishop (Utah) and Rep. Peter DeFazio (Oregon), which would expedite transfers of land between states and federal agencies.