Owyhee Canyonlands

The Wilderness Society has worked for eight years to protect the spectacular Owyhee Canyonlands. Now we’re working with local partners to fulfill our conservation commitments.

In 2009, we helped permanently protect the high deserts and life-giving rivers of the Owyhee Canyonlands. We are still working today to develop science-based management plans to ensure the Owyhee Canyonlands remain healthy and thriving.

Why Owyhee Canyonlands

The Owyhee Canyonlands is like no other area in the U.S. and well deserving of strong permanent protection.

We worked for eight years to get permanent protection of the Owyhee and its spectacular canyonlands. Now we’re working to ensure those safeguards stay put.

Work we’re doing

We worked for eight years to get permanent protection of the Owyhee and its spectacular canyonlands. Now we’re working to ensure those safeguards stay put. 

Our Partners

For over a decade, we have worked with groups of ranchers, conservation professionals, agricultural interests, sportsmen, outfitters and guides to care for the Owyhee Canyonlands.   

  • Neil Shader

    A report on landscape-based mitigation released by the Interior Department Energy and Climate Change Task Force, “A Strategy for Improving the Mitigation Policies and Practices of The Department of the Interior,”  provides a blueprint for better protection for fish, wildlife, recreation and wild land values for the tens of millions of acres of public lands open to oil and gas and other energy development.

  • Michael Reinemer

    This weekend, veterans from around the West will be visiting the rolling, boulder-strewn landscape of the Dragoon Mountains south of Tucson to participate in a writing workshop that will guide them on skills needed to create narratives of fiction, non-fiction, or poetry that is informed both by their service experiences and the natural environment.

  • Neil Shader

    The following statement on the confirmation of Neil Kornze to be the Director of the Bureau of Land Management can be attributed to Jamie Williams, president of The Wilderness Society.