Petaca Pinta

Petaca Pinta is a stunning wildland and natural landmark in the heart of New Mexico's red-rock country.

While hardly remote, New Mexico's Petaca Pinta wilderness remains one of New Mexico’s wildest landscapes and potential playgrounds. Just 60 miles west of Albuquerque, this rugged red-rock country is largely undiscovered.

Filled with volcanic plugs, juniper-studded mesas, dramatic red-rock cliffs and a 1,000 foot escarpment that reveals millions of years of geologic history, Petaca Pinta is one of our greatest untamed landscapes.

Why Petaca Pinta

The Petaca Pinta area is a rich and beautiful wilderness area within New Mexico's red-rock country featuring prairie grasses waving through the remnants of ancient civilization.

Work we are doing

At Wilderness, we’re working to protect the juniper-studded mesas and red rock canyons of Petaca Pinta and to protect it from over-use by off-road vehicles and oil and gas development.

  • Michael Reinemer
    The Wilderness Society today praised Rep. Jared Polis (D-Colo.) for introducing important legislation that would conserve more than 58,000 acres of public lands in Colorado’s Eagle and Summit Counties including approximately 40,000 acres of wilderness and more than 18,000 acres as special management areas.  
     
  • Michael Reinemer
    To mark the 50th year since the signing of the Wilderness Act in 1964, the Getches-Wilkinson Center for Natural Resources, Energy and the Environment and The Wilderness Society will host a conference on September 4 and 5 at the University of Colorado Law School in Boulder. “Celebrating the Great Law: The Wilderness Act at 50” will feature prominent authors, professors, historians, activists and Colorado’s poet laureate.  
     
  • cate tanenbaum

    Wilderness Society applauds House for moving beyond ‘gridlock’ but says new amendments lead legislation astray

    The Wilderness Society today praised the House Natural Resources Comamittee for advancing Wilderness designations for Washington state and Nevada but worries House legislation departs too significantly from more locally supported counterpart bills in the Senate.