Media resources for Too Wild To Drill report

Sep 19, 2017

The Wilderness Society is pleased to offer the following assets to media covering "Too Wild to Drill." **Please include attributions indicated below with all uses of these materials.**

Too Wild To Drill identifies 15 unique places found on public lands that are at high risk of drilling, mining and other development—and the damage and destruction that inevitably follow.

National news release


Alaska

Arctic National Wildlife Refuge

The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in northeastern Alaska is one of the last pristine and untouched wild landscapes on Earth.

What's at stake: At 19.3 million acres, the vast refuge encompasses coastal lagoons, windswept alpine tundra, boreal forest and other varied habitat that is home to some of the most diverse and stunning populations of wildlife in the Arctic--including polar and grizzly bears, wolves, beluga and bowhead whales; more than 200 migratory and resident bird species; and the Porcupine Caribou Herd. Stretching from the peaks of the Brooks Range Mountains to the icy waters of the Arctic Ocean, the refuge's coastal plain contains the most important land denning habitat for polar bears along America's Arctic coast.
 
Threat: Oil drilling
 
 
Media contact:
Tim Woody
Alaska Communications Manager, TWS
(907) 223-2443
tim_woody@tws.org

B-roll footage

**Please credit The Wilderness Society for any and all uses of these video files.**

Download HD video file (15.7 MB)
Duration: 7 seconds
Description: The Brooks Range seen from the coastal plain

Download HD video file (55 MB)
Duration: 28 seconds
Description: Caribou grazing on the coastal plain

Download HD video file (19.2 MB)
Duration: 10 seconds
Description: Whitewater rafters in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge

Download HD video file (58.8 MB)
Duration: 29 seconds
Description: Fly fisherman in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge

Photographs

**Please credit © Arto Saari (Appeal to Reason Media) for any and all uses of these photographs.**

Download high-resolution file (1 MB)
Credit: © Arto Saari (Appeal to Reason Media)

 

Arizona

Greater Grand Canyon Watershed

The Greater Grand Canyon Watershed is a natural wonder that embraces one of America's most spectacular landscapes--The Grand Canyon.

What's at stake: Stretching across hundreds of thousands of acres of the "Arizona Strip" and on land both north and south of the Grand Canyon, this area is one of the wildest and most ecologically significant regions in the West. 

Threat: Uranium mining

News release

Media contact:
Jen Dickson
Southwest Communications Manager, TWS
(303) 650-9379
jennifer_dickson@tws.org

Photographs

**Please credit Jessica Pope for any and all uses of these photographs.**

Download high-resolution file (10.3 MB)
Credit: Jessica Pope

Download high-resolution file (6.8 MB)
Credit: Jessica Pope


California

Mojave Trails National Monument

Mojave Trails National Monument protects a stunning array of desert plant life and wildlife habitat across 1.6 million acres in southern California. 

What's at stake: It represents the key last piece in a corridor of fully protected lands between Joshua Tree National Park and Mojave National Preserve. 

Threat: Mining

News release

Media contact:
Andrea Alday
California Communications Manager, TWS
(626) 788-4323
andrea_alday@tws.org

B-roll footage

**Please credit The Wilderness Society for any and all uses of these video files.**

Download HD (2.7K) video file (50.7 MB)
Duration: 34 seconds
Description: Aerial view of Mojave Trails National Monument

Download HD video file (18 MB)
Duration: 13 seconds
Description: Hiker in Mojave Trails National Monument

Photographs

**Please credit the photographers indicated below for any and all uses of these photographs.**

Download high-resolution file (2.5 MB)
Credit: Bob Wick, BLM

Download high-resolution file (1.3 MB)
Credit: Bob Wick, BLM

Download high-resolution file (24 MB)
Credit: Mason Cummings, The Wilderness Society 

Download high-resolution file (18.6 MB)
Credit: Mason Cummings, The Wilderness Society


Colorado

North Fork of the Gunnison

The North Fork of the Gunnison River makes its way out of Colorado’s wild forests in the Thompson Divide area, through the fertile North Fork Valley, finally joining the mighty Gunnison River just after it roars out of Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Park.

What's at stake: Locally referred to as the North Fork, this river emerges from some of Colorado’s most spectacular high-country wildlands and sustains a thriving farming and ranching community, including Colorado’s highest concentration of organic farms.

Threat: Oil and gas drilling

News release

Media contact:
Pete Kolbenshlag
Mountain West Strategies
(970) 261-0678
pete@mountainweststrategies.com

B-roll footage

**Please credit The Wilderness Society for any and all uses of these video files.**

Download HD video file (25 MB)
Duration: 12 seconds
Description: Timelapse of clouds over the North Fork Valley

Download HD video file (31.7 MB)
Duration: 15 seconds
Description: Aerial view of drill rig in the North Fork Valley

Photographs

**Please credit photographers indicated below for any and all uses of these photographs.**

Download high-resolution file (35.6 MB)
Credit: Mason Cummings, The Wilderness Society

Download high-resolution file (33.3 MB)
Credit: Mason Cummings, The Wilderness Society

Download high-resolution file (2.1 MB)
Credit: Jim Brett

Download high-resolution file (2.6 MB)
Credit: Jim Brett


Minnesota

Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness

The Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness is America’s most-visited designated wilderness area. Located in northeastern Minnesota, this national treasure contains 1.1 million acres of interconnected lakes and rivers surrounded by the unspoiled Superior National Forest.

What's at stake: Generations of Americans have developed a lifelong love of nature through the superb fishing, canoeing, hiking, and portaging experiences that can be found in the Boundary Waters’ tranquil lakes, trails, and more than 1,200 miles of canoe routes.

Threat: Sulfide-ore copper mining

News release

Media contact:
Scott Beauchamp
Director of Media Relations, Campaign to Save the Boundary Waters
(651) 788-0175
scittb@savetheboundarywaters.org

Photographs

**Please credit the photographers indicated below for any and all uses of these photographs.**

Download high-resolution file (1.6 MB)
Credit: Brian O'Keefe

Download high-resolution file (1.8 MB)
Credit: Dave Freeman

Download high-resolution file (4.8 MB)
Credit: Jim Brett

Download high-resolution file (2.6 MB)
Credit: Dave Freeman

Download high-resolution file (2.1 MB)
Credit: Dave Freeman

 

Montana

Badger-Two Medicine

Culture and wildlands converge in the 130,000-acre Badger-Two Medicine area of the Helena-Lewis and Clark National Forest in northwestern Montana.

What's at stake: For the Blackfeet Nation, the Badger-Two Medicine is considered the cradle of their culture, home of their creation story and the sacred Sun Dance that links millennia of history and culture with current and future generations. It is also ecologically irreplaceable: a place teeming with native wildlife species, including grizzly bear, genetically pure cutthroat trout, wolves, wolverine and elk. The Badger-Two Medicine is the connective habitat that provides needed migration paths between Glacier National Park and the Bob Marshall Wilderness Complex, as well as critical sanctuary for plants and wildlife. It is also the headwaters of two major waterways that feed the Blackfeet Reservation and the entire northern plains of Montana.

Threat: Oil and gas drilling

News release

Media contact:
Becky Edwards, Sun Snow Creative
(406) 570-9427
becky@sunsnowcreative.com

Photographs

**These images are available for licensing through Tony Bynum Photography. For more information please contact Helen Troy at helen@tonybynum.com. Low-resolution images can be used for digital publication under creative commons, with attribution (Tony Bynum), noncommercial, no derivatives, with a link back to www.tonybynum.com.**

Download web-resolution thumbnail (49 KB)
License high-resolution file

Credit: tonybynum.com

Download web-resolution thumbnail (64 KB)
License high-resolution file
Credit: tonybynum.com

Download web-resolution thumbnail (77 KB)
License high-resolution file
Credit: tonybynum.com

 

Paradise Valley

There’s a reason Yellowstone National Park was the first national park designated in the United States. Even back in 1872, the rare and extraordinary values of Yellowstone were recognized as national treasures, leading Congress to set them aside for the future enjoyment of all Americans.

What's at stake: The Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem is a haven for vanishing wildlife species such as grizzly bears, gray wolves, and lynx, and its world-renowned scenery encompasses ten Wilderness Areas and several million additional acres that have been recommended for wilderness designation. 

Threat: Gold mining

News release

Media contact:
Becky Edwards, Sun Snow Creative
(406) 570-9427
becky@sunsnowcreative.com

Photographs

**Please credit William Campbell for any and all uses of these photographs.**

Download high-resolution file (32.6 MB)
Credit: William Campbell

Download high-resolution file (39.7 MB)
Credit: William Campbell

Download high-resolution file (29 MB)
Credit: William Campbell

Download high-resolution file (38.1 MB)
Credit: William Campbell


Nevada

Owyhee Desert Sagebrush

The sagebrush sea stretching across our western public lands is an endangered ecosystem, vanishing more each year due to sprawling energy development, population growth, and many other land uses steadily eroding a once-ubiquitous sagebrush ecosystem.

What's at stake: The destruction of western sagebrush impacts more than 350 species that rely on the ecosystem—from pygmy rabbits to pronghorn. One of the more imminently threatened species is the greater sage-grouse, a bird perhaps best known for its mating ritual dance.

Threat: Mining, oil and gas drilling

News release

Media contact:
Jen Dickson
Southwest Communications Manager, TWS
(303) 650-9379
jennifer_dickson@tws.org

Photographs

**Please credit photographers indicated below for any and all use of these photographs.**

Download high-resolution file (6.8 MB)
Credit: Bob Wick, BLM

Download web-resolution file (927 KB)
Credit: Scott Moore, Friends of Nevada Wilderness

Download high-resolution file (2 MB)
Credit: Scott Moore, Friends of Nevada Wilderness

 

New Mexico

Chihuahuan Desert Rivers

Southern New Mexico’s Chihuahuan Desert, a vast expanse of rolling grasslands dotted with remote desert mountains, is a unique and highly threatened ecosystem. South of Carlsbad, the public lands around Carlsbad Caverns National Park are home to a thriving Chihuahuan Desert river system.

What's at stake: The area contains valuable riparian habitat for fish and wildlife and can act as a refuge for species under stress from climate change. 

Threat: Oil and gas drilling

News release

Media contact:
Jen Dickson
Southwest Communications Manager, TWS
(303) 650-9379
jennifer_dickson@tws.org

Photographs

**Please credit the photographers indicated below for any and all uses of these photographs.**

Download web-resolution file (913 KB)
Credit: Gosia Allison-Kosior

Download web-resolution file (552 KB)
Credit: Gosia Allison-Kosior

Download web-resolution file (557 KB)
Credit: Jim O'Donnell

 

Ohio

Wayne National Forest

“The Wayne,” as local residents affectionately refer to Ohio’s only national forest, draws nearly a quarter of a million visitors each year to hike and ride its trails, paddle its rivers and streams, and take in the forest’s scenery and unique history. Home to hundreds of species of birds, mammals, trees, fish and amphibians, the Wayne spans roughly 250,000 acres of public land across three units in southeast Ohio. 

What's at stake: Besides the recreational opportunities and wildlife habitat the Wayne provides, the forest also includes the Little Muskingum River—a tributary to the Ohio River, which provides clean drinking water for millions of Americans.

Threat: Oil and gas drilling and fracking

News release

Media contact:
David Miller
Deputy Director, Communications, Ohio Environmental Council
(419) 944-1986
dmiller@oec.org

Photographs

**Please credit Rebecca Pollard for any and all uses of these photographs.**

Download high-resolution file (9.5 MB)
Credit: Rebecca Pollard

Download web-resolution file (10.1 MB)
Credit: Rebecca Pollard

Download high-resolution file (5.5 MB)
Credit: Rebecca Pollard

Download web-resolution file (10.4 MB)
Credit: Rebecca Pollard

Download high-resolution file (9.9 MB)
Credit: Rebecca Pollard

 

Utah

Bears Ears National Monument

Nestled in the same southeastern Utah region as Canyonlands and Arches National Park, Bears Ears National Monument protects a landscape with an incredible array of cultural, scenic, and scientific values.

What's at stake: It is hard to overstate the cultural significance of the monument, which was first recognized as worthy of protections by the Franklin D. Roosevelt administration over 80 years ago.

Threat: Oil and gas drilling, potash and uranium mining

News release

Media contact:
Pam Avery
President, AveryMassey LLC
(402) 305-0799
pam@AveryMassey.com

B-roll footage

**Please credit The Wilderness Society for any and all uses of these video files.**

Download HD video file (35.3 MB)
Duration: 18 seconds
Description: Sunset light on Comb Ridge

Download HD video file (7.3 MB)
Duration: 4 seconds
Description: Ancient Puebloan ruins on the San Juan River

Download HD video file (19.2 MB)
Duration: 9 seconds
Description: Aerial view of the San Juan River

Download HD video file (23 MB)
Duration: 15 seconds
Description: Hikers in Owl Canyon

Download HD video file (17.1 MB)
Duration: 31 seconds
Description: Ancient Puebloan ruins on the San Juan River

Download HD video file (19.4 MB)
Duration: 9 seconds
Description: Aerial view of hikers above Road Canyon
 

Download HD video file (12.1 MB)
Duration: 8 seconds
Description: Ancient Puebloan ruins in Owl Canyon

Download HD video file (17.1 MB)
Duration: 11 seconds
Description: Rafters on the San Juan River

Download HD video file (7.8 MB)
Duration: 6 seconds
Description: Ancient Puebloan ruins on the San Juan River

Download HD video file (44.9 MB)
Duration: 22 seconds
Description: Aerial view of Road Canyon
 

Photographs

**Please credit Mason Cummings, The Wilderness Society for any and all uses of these photographs.**

Download high-resolution file (50.7 MB)
Credit: Mason Cummings, The Wilderness Society

Download web-resolution file (24.4 MB)
Credit: Mason Cummings, The Wilderness Society

Download high-resolution file (50 MB)
Credit: Mason Cummings, The Wilderness Society

Download web-resolution file (10.4 MB)
Credit: Mason Cummings, The Wilderness Society

Download high-resolution file (27.2  MB)
Credit: Mason Cummings, The Wilderness Society

Download high-resolution file (7.7 MB)
Credit: Mason Cummings, The Wilderness Society

Download high-resolution file (15.5 MB)
Credit: Mason Cummings, The Wilderness Society

Download high-resolution file (18.4 MB)
Credit: Mason Cummings, The Wilderness Society

Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument

Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument in southern Utah is a geological, paleontological, and scenic treasure unrivaled in the world. The slot canyons, arches, and stunning features of the landscape inspire wonder in those who visit. 

What's at stake: This national monument is one of the wildest places in America. It is popular with campers and backpackers, but is also a destination for scientific research, with hundreds of recorded archaeological sites and a high concentration of dinosaur fossils.

Threat: Coal mining

News release

Media contact:
Pam Avery
President, AveryMassey LLC
(402) 305-0799
pam@AveryMassey.com

B-roll footage

**Please credit The Wilderness Society for any and all uses of these video files.**

Download HD video file (69.3 MB)
Duration: 33 seconds
Description: Aerial view of cliffs in the southern portion of Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument

Download HD video file (82.8MB)
Duration: 42 seconds
Description: Aerial view of cliffs in the southern portion of Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument

Download HD video file (64.2MB)
Duration: 32 seconds
Description: Aerial view of canyons in the southern portion of Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument

Download HD video file (35.3 MB)
Duration: 17 seconds
Description: Hiker on canyon rim in the southern portion of Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument

Download HD video file (27.7 MB)
Duration: 13 seconds
Description: Pinion pine on the Kaiparowits Plateau

Download HD video file (27.6 MB)
Duration: 11 seconds
Description: Landscape of the Kaiparowits Plateau

Download HD video file (40 MB)
Duration: 20 seconds
Description: Straight Cliffs seen from near Hole in the Rock Road

Download HD video file (26.7 MB)
Duration: 13 seconds
Description: View from inside Peek-A-Boo Slot Canyon
 

Download HD video file (26.1 MB)
Duration: 12 seconds
Description: Timelapse over the Escalante River
 

Download HD video file (29.9 MB)
Duration: 15 seconds
Description: Sunset near Calf Creek Recreation Area

Download HD video file (24.1 MB)
Duration: 11 seconds
Description: Sunrise at Circle Cliffs

Download HD video file (24.9 MB)
Duration: 12 seconds
Description: Sunrise at Circle Cliffs

Download HD video file (116 MB)
Duration: 59 seconds
Description: Monument entry sign

 

Photographs

**Please credit the photographers indicated below for any and all uses of these photographs.**

Download high-resolution file (4.6 MB)
Credit: Mason Cummings, The Wilderness Society

Download web-resolution file (5.2 MB)
Credit: Mason Cummings, The Wilderness Society

Download high-resolution file (3 MB)
Credit: Mason Cummings, The Wilderness Society

Download web-resolution file (4 MB)
Credit: Mason Cummings, The Wilderness Society

Download high-resolution file (13.7 MB)
Credit: Bob Wick, BLM

Download high-resolution file (11.3 MB)
Credit: Bob Wick, BLM

Download high-resolution file (17.4 MB)
Credit: Bob Wick, BLM

Download high-resolution file (5.4 MB)
Credit: Mason Cummings, The Wilderness Society


Virginia

Appalachian Trail

The Appalachian Trail is one of the longest hiking trails in the world, winding for more than 2,000 miles through 14 states, from Maine to Georgia. The long-distance hiking and backpacking opportunities provided by the Appalachian Trail are especially hard to come by in the eastern U.S., making the trail and its surrounding lands truly special and worth protecting. The trail sees 3 million visitors every year, thanks to its accessibility from major population centers, including our nation’s capital. 

What's at stake: From thick spruce-fir forests to ridgelines offering sweeping mountain views, the Appalachian Trail offers one of the most incredible outdoor recreation experiences in the country.

Threat: Natural gas pipeline

News release

Media contact:
Michael Reinemer
Deputy Director, Wildlands Communications, TWS
(202) 429-3949
michael_reinemer@tws.org

Photographs

**Please credit the photographers indicated below for any and all uses of these photographs.**

Download web-resolution file (1 MB)
Credit: ksteryous, flickr

Download high-resolution file (25 MB)
Credit: Mason Cummings, The Wilderness Society

Download high-resolution file (6.8 MB)
Credit: Photo courtesy of Appalachian Trail Conservancy

 

Washington

Green River Valley

The Green River Valley is a remote destination for true wilderness recreation experiences in Washington’s South Cascades. Located more than two hours from Portland, and accessible only by one single-lane U.S. Forest Service road, the valley is sought out by hunters, anglers, equestrians, and backpackers looking to escape into the Washington wilderness.

What's at stake: The Green River Valley is a place of stunning scenery and unbound back-country recreation opportunities.

Threat: Copper, gold, and molybdenum mining

News release

Media contact:
Anastasia Greene
Northwest Communications Manager, TWS
(202) 429-2624
anastasia_greene@tws.org

Photographs

**Please credit the photographers indicated below for any and all uses of these photographs.**

Download high-resolution file (2.8 MB)
Credit: Trip Jennings, Balance Media

Download high-resolution file (8 MB)
Credit: Michael Sulis


Northern Red Desert

Wyoming’s Northern Red Desert is sometimes referred to as “The Big Empty.” Sprawled across nearly 700,000 acres—more than double the size of Grand Teton National Park—the Northern Red Desert is certainly big. But with its extraordinary wildlife, dramatic scenery, nationally important historic trails and expansive wilderness-quality lands, the Northern Red Desert is anything but empty.

What's at stake: Some of the West's most iconic historic trails are found here, and the desert provides a refuge for wildlife from extensive oil and gas development in the region.

Threat: Oil and gas drilling

Media contact:
Becky Edwards
Owner, Sun Snow Creative
(406) 570-9427
becky@sunsnowcreative.com

Photographs

**Please credit the photographers indicated below for any and all uses of these photographs.**

Download high-resolution file (3.9 MB)
Credit: Scott Copeland

Download high-resolution file (4.3 MB)
Credit: Kathy Lichtendahl