Projects in Other States

While renewable energy is much needed, if it’s not developed in the right areas, it could harm wild lands and wildlife habitat.

In addition to our work on proposed renewable energy projects in the California desert, on the Colorado Plateau and in the Northern Forests, we are also working in other states to make sure renewable energy development does not damage sensitive wild lands.

Crescent Dunes Solar

The Crescent Dunes Solar project, a 110 megawatt project proposed west of Tonopah, Nevada, by Solar Reserve, was approved by the BLM in December 2010 and is now under construction. The Wilderness Society worked with our conservation partners, the BLM and the project developer to limit impacts to wildlands and wildlife habitat and maximize clean energy benefits for this project.

Sonoran Solar

The Sonoran Solar project, a 300 megawatt project proposed west of Phoenix, Arizona, by NextEra Energy, was approved by the BLM in December 2011. The Wilderness Society worked with our conservation partners, the BLM and the project developer to reduce impacts on wildlife habitat and wildlands.

SunZia Southwest Transmission

The proposed SunZia Southwest transmission project would run from central New Mexico to south-central Arizona. The project should not be built through Arizona’s sensitive San Pedro Valley or the Aravaipa Canyon area.

The proposed SunZia Southwest transmission project would run from central New Mexico to south-central Arizona. The project should not be built through Arizona’s sensitive San Pedro Valley or the Aravaipa Canyon area. - See more at: http://wilderness.org/article/sunzia-transmission#sthash.C5OiMMMo.dpuf

West Butte Wind

West Butte Wind, a 104 megawatt project proposed in central Oregon, was approved by the BLM in July 2011. The Wilderness Society worked with our conservation partners, the BLM and the project developer to lessen impacts on wildlands and wildlife habitat.

 

  • In the first of a three management plans to be released in 2015, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) in Colorado missed a great opportunity to protect some of Colorado's most treasured landscapes—including the Dolores River, lands surrounding Mesa Verde National Park and recreation hub

  • When school was out for the summer in the suburbs of Manhattan where I grew up, my mom packed our little Subaru hatchback with sleeping bags, a tent, a cooler filled with fruit and sandwich meat, hiking boots, rain gear, and three kids, and headed West.  Like generations before and since, w

  • The Forest Service recently released a plan that could protect much of Colorado’s Thompson Divide from new oil and gas leasing. For years, this spectacular area has been threatened by oil and gas development.