Projects in Other States

While renewable energy is much needed, if it’s not developed in the right areas, it could harm wild lands and wildlife habitat.

In addition to our work on proposed renewable energy projects in the California desert, on the Colorado Plateau and in the Northern Forests, we are also working in other states to make sure renewable energy development does not damage sensitive wild lands.

Crescent Dunes Solar

The Crescent Dunes Solar project, a 110 megawatt project proposed west of Tonopah, Nevada, by Solar Reserve, was approved by the BLM in December 2010 and is now under construction. The Wilderness Society worked with our conservation partners, the BLM and the project developer to limit impacts to wildlands and wildlife habitat and maximize clean energy benefits for this project.

Sonoran Solar

The Sonoran Solar project, a 300 megawatt project proposed west of Phoenix, Arizona, by NextEra Energy, was approved by the BLM in December 2011. The Wilderness Society worked with our conservation partners, the BLM and the project developer to reduce impacts on wildlife habitat and wildlands.

SunZia Southwest Transmission

The proposed SunZia Southwest transmission project would run from central New Mexico to south-central Arizona. The project should not be built through Arizona’s sensitive San Pedro Valley or the Aravaipa Canyon area.

The proposed SunZia Southwest transmission project would run from central New Mexico to south-central Arizona. The project should not be built through Arizona’s sensitive San Pedro Valley or the Aravaipa Canyon area. - See more at: http://wilderness.org/article/sunzia-transmission#sthash.C5OiMMMo.dpuf

West Butte Wind

West Butte Wind, a 104 megawatt project proposed in central Oregon, was approved by the BLM in July 2011. The Wilderness Society worked with our conservation partners, the BLM and the project developer to lessen impacts on wildlands and wildlife habitat.

 

  • Max Greenberg

    The Wilderness Society is pleased to join California desert residents, local elected officials, tribal representatives and community leaders dedicating the newly designated Mojave Trails, Sand to Snow and Castle Mountains National Monuments. United States Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell; California Secretary for Natural Resources John Laird; Congressman Raul Ruiz (CA-36); Jody Noiron, Forest Supervisor, San Bernardino National Forest, U.S.

  • Jennifer Dickson

    During its history, the state of Idaho has sold off more than 1.7 million acres of land to private interests, according to an analysis of land sale data by The Wilderness Society released this week.

  • Michael Reinemer

    On Bureau of Land Management (BLM) lands and National Forests, the agencies are mismanaging the use of off-road vehicles (ORVs) such as dirt bikes, snowmobiles, and all-terrain vehicles, resulting in unnecessary damage to watersheds and wildlife, and conflict with other recreationists. This is in spite of a long-standing legal obligation dating back to the 1970s that requires federal land agencies to minimize such damage and conflict.