Projects in Other States

While renewable energy is much needed, if it’s not developed in the right areas, it could harm wild lands and wildlife habitat.

In addition to our work on proposed renewable energy projects in the California desert, on the Colorado Plateau and in the Northern Forests, we are also working in other states to make sure renewable energy development does not damage sensitive wild lands.

Crescent Dunes Solar

The Crescent Dunes Solar project, a 110 megawatt project proposed west of Tonopah, Nevada, by Solar Reserve, was approved by the BLM in December 2010 and is now under construction. The Wilderness Society worked with our conservation partners, the BLM and the project developer to limit impacts to wildlands and wildlife habitat and maximize clean energy benefits for this project.

Sonoran Solar

The Sonoran Solar project, a 300 megawatt project proposed west of Phoenix, Arizona, by NextEra Energy, was approved by the BLM in December 2011. The Wilderness Society worked with our conservation partners, the BLM and the project developer to reduce impacts on wildlife habitat and wildlands.

SunZia Southwest Transmission

The proposed SunZia Southwest transmission project would run from central New Mexico to south-central Arizona. The project should not be built through Arizona’s sensitive San Pedro Valley or the Aravaipa Canyon area.

The proposed SunZia Southwest transmission project would run from central New Mexico to south-central Arizona. The project should not be built through Arizona’s sensitive San Pedro Valley or the Aravaipa Canyon area. - See more at: http://wilderness.org/article/sunzia-transmission#sthash.C5OiMMMo.dpuf

West Butte Wind

West Butte Wind, a 104 megawatt project proposed in central Oregon, was approved by the BLM in July 2011. The Wilderness Society worked with our conservation partners, the BLM and the project developer to lessen impacts on wildlands and wildlife habitat.

 

  • Neil Shader

    A report on landscape-based mitigation released by the Interior Department Energy and Climate Change Task Force, “A Strategy for Improving the Mitigation Policies and Practices of The Department of the Interior,”  provides a blueprint for better protection for fish, wildlife, recreation and wild land values for the tens of millions of acres of public lands open to oil and gas and other energy development.

  • Michael Reinemer

    This weekend, veterans from around the West will be visiting the rolling, boulder-strewn landscape of the Dragoon Mountains south of Tucson to participate in a writing workshop that will guide them on skills needed to create narratives of fiction, non-fiction, or poetry that is informed both by their service experiences and the natural environment.

  • Neil Shader

    The following statement on the confirmation of Neil Kornze to be the Director of the Bureau of Land Management can be attributed to Jamie Williams, president of The Wilderness Society.