Projects in Other States

While renewable energy is much needed, if it’s not developed in the right areas, it could harm wild lands and wildlife habitat.

In addition to our work on proposed renewable energy projects in the California desert, on the Colorado Plateau and in the Northern Forests, we are also working in other states to make sure renewable energy development does not damage sensitive wild lands.

Crescent Dunes Solar

The Crescent Dunes Solar project, a 110 megawatt project proposed west of Tonopah, Nevada, by Solar Reserve, was approved by the BLM in December 2010 and is now under construction. The Wilderness Society worked with our conservation partners, the BLM and the project developer to limit impacts to wildlands and wildlife habitat and maximize clean energy benefits for this project.

Sonoran Solar

The Sonoran Solar project, a 300 megawatt project proposed west of Phoenix, Arizona, by NextEra Energy, was approved by the BLM in December 2011. The Wilderness Society worked with our conservation partners, the BLM and the project developer to reduce impacts on wildlife habitat and wildlands.

SunZia Southwest Transmission

The proposed SunZia Southwest transmission project would run from central New Mexico to south-central Arizona. The project should not be built through Arizona’s sensitive San Pedro Valley or the Aravaipa Canyon area.

The proposed SunZia Southwest transmission project would run from central New Mexico to south-central Arizona. The project should not be built through Arizona’s sensitive San Pedro Valley or the Aravaipa Canyon area. - See more at: http://wilderness.org/article/sunzia-transmission#sthash.C5OiMMMo.dpuf

West Butte Wind

West Butte Wind, a 104 megawatt project proposed in central Oregon, was approved by the BLM in July 2011. The Wilderness Society worked with our conservation partners, the BLM and the project developer to lessen impacts on wildlands and wildlife habitat.

 

  • In this report, we provide the policy framework for designating ORV trails and areas on federal lands, along with a series of recommendations based on recent case law and ten case studies from the Forest Service, BLM, and National Park Service that demonstrate both agency failures to comply with the executive order minimization criteria and good planning practices that could be incorporated into a model for application of the criteria.
  • Chart of offshore oil well blowout incident rates illustrates the need for stronger federal regulations to improve human safety and decrease environmental risk.

  • This fourth in a series of Easy to Start, Impossible to Finish reports analyzes four major transportation and energy projects in the planning stages in the state of Alaska. Alaska Gov. Bill Walker stopped discretionary spending on these four projects–the proposed Ambler Road in the Arctic Interior, Juneau Access, the Knik Arm Bridge and the Susitna-Watana Dam–soon after he took office in 2014. During 2015, Gov. Walker reversed course and allowed these projects to continue spending money on studies.