Projects in Other States

While renewable energy is much needed, if it’s not developed in the right areas, it could harm wild lands and wildlife habitat.

In addition to our work on proposed renewable energy projects in the California desert, on the Colorado Plateau and in the Northern Forests, we are also working in other states to make sure renewable energy development does not damage sensitive wild lands.

Crescent Dunes Solar

The Crescent Dunes Solar project, a 110 megawatt project proposed west of Tonopah, Nevada, by Solar Reserve, was approved by the BLM in December 2010 and is now under construction. The Wilderness Society worked with our conservation partners, the BLM and the project developer to limit impacts to wildlands and wildlife habitat and maximize clean energy benefits for this project.

Sonoran Solar

The Sonoran Solar project, a 300 megawatt project proposed west of Phoenix, Arizona, by NextEra Energy, was approved by the BLM in December 2011. The Wilderness Society worked with our conservation partners, the BLM and the project developer to reduce impacts on wildlife habitat and wildlands.

SunZia Southwest Transmission

The proposed SunZia Southwest transmission project would run from central New Mexico to south-central Arizona. The project should not be built through Arizona’s sensitive San Pedro Valley or the Aravaipa Canyon area.

The proposed SunZia Southwest transmission project would run from central New Mexico to south-central Arizona. The project should not be built through Arizona’s sensitive San Pedro Valley or the Aravaipa Canyon area. - See more at: http://wilderness.org/article/sunzia-transmission#sthash.C5OiMMMo.dpuf

West Butte Wind

West Butte Wind, a 104 megawatt project proposed in central Oregon, was approved by the BLM in July 2011. The Wilderness Society worked with our conservation partners, the BLM and the project developer to lessen impacts on wildlands and wildlife habitat.

 

  • BLM Planning 2.0 hearing support documents

  • 2015 Audited Financial Statements

  • This report describes how the U.S. government agency that oversees 700 million subsurface acres of oil and gas resources on nearly 250 million acres of public lands is saddled with outdated and unbalanced policies, often contradicting its own mandate to manage the land for multiple uses.

    90 percent of the public lands managed by the Bureau of Land Management is open to oil and gas leasing, even in areas with little or no potential for developing these resources, compromising potential for protecting wildlife and recreation, while encouraging speculative leasing.