Proposed Projects

America’s public lands will soon host many wind and solar energy projects proposed to the government. We’re working to make sure those projects do not harm sensitive wildlands and wildlife habitat.

By getting involved in renewable energy projects, The Wilderness Society can:

  • Help improve good proposals
  • Help steer bad proposals away from our best wildlands
  • Ensure sensitive wildlife habitats aren’t harmed by renewable energy infrastructure and activities

The rapid increase in companies applying to build wind and solar projects and transmission lines on public lands demonstrates a great move towards creating a clean energy future — but these projects can harm our natural heritage.

By working with conservation partners, project developers, land managers like the BLM and the forest service and others, we can protect wildlands while transitioning away from polluting fossil fuels.

Protecting key wild lands and wildlife habitat from development

Our wildest lands and sensitive wildlife habitat are inappropriate for development of any kind. When renewable energy projects are proposed in these locations, we work to steer developers to more appropriate places or block bad proposals if alternative solutions cannot be found.

Improving project proposals to limit impacts and maximize benefits

Even when projects are proposed in areas that are generally appropriate, we can often help gain improvements by recommending changes to the proposed project footprint or technology. Reducing impacts while maximizing clean energy output from project sites are important elements of responsible renewable energy development.

Proposed projects we are engaged in

The Wilderness Society is engaged in a number of proposed projects across the nation. More information on key projects is found on the regional projects pages below:

  • Michael Reinemer

    The Wilderness Society commends the Obama Administration for making history today by quadrupling the size of the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument, now the largest protected area in the world, measuring 582,578 square miles.

  • Michael Reinemer

    The Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument will be a unit of the National Park Service and was announced on the eve of the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service, which was established on August 25, 1916.

  • Max Greenberg

    The next fiscal year starts on Oct. 1, meaning that Congress is running out of time to cobble together "must-pass" appropriations legislation that will pay for the day-to-day expenses of the federal government.

    But in what has become a sad annual commentary on some leaders' dereliction of America's conservation tradition, the process is gummed up with counterproductive “riders” that have no place in the appropriations process, and would hurt wildlands right when they sorely need our help.