Proposed Projects

America’s public lands will soon host many wind and solar energy projects proposed to the government. We’re working to make sure those projects do not harm sensitive wildlands and wildlife habitat.

By getting involved in renewable energy projects, The Wilderness Society can:

  • Help improve good proposals
  • Help steer bad proposals away from our best wildlands
  • Ensure sensitive wildlife habitats aren’t harmed by renewable energy infrastructure and activities

The rapid increase in companies applying to build wind and solar projects and transmission lines on public lands demonstrates a great move towards creating a clean energy future — but these projects can harm our natural heritage.

By working with conservation partners, project developers, land managers like the BLM and the forest service and others, we can protect wildlands while transitioning away from polluting fossil fuels.

Protecting key wild lands and wildlife habitat from development

Our wildest lands and sensitive wildlife habitat are inappropriate for development of any kind. When renewable energy projects are proposed in these locations, we work to steer developers to more appropriate places or block bad proposals if alternative solutions cannot be found.

Improving project proposals to limit impacts and maximize benefits

Even when projects are proposed in areas that are generally appropriate, we can often help gain improvements by recommending changes to the proposed project footprint or technology. Reducing impacts while maximizing clean energy output from project sites are important elements of responsible renewable energy development.

Proposed projects we are engaged in

The Wilderness Society is engaged in a number of proposed projects across the nation. More information on key projects is found on the regional projects pages below:

  • Neil Shader

    New legislation introduced today in the House and the Senate would undermine state and federal planning efforts, nearly complete, to conserve the greater sage grouse and perpetuate uncertainty faced by all westerners, according to The Wilderness Society. The following statement can be attributed to Chase Huntley, senior government relations director for The Wilderness Society.

  • Neil Shader

    Authorization for LWCF runs out on September 30 2015.

    Today, Earth Day, the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee will hold a hearing on “reauthorization and potential reforms” to LWCF. Funded primarily by offshore oil royalties—not taxpayer dollars—the program has had strong bipartisan support since its enactment in 1964. The Wilderness Society strongly supports several bills to reauthorize LWCF including S. 890, S. 338 and H.R. 1814, now pending in Congress.

  • Neil Shader

    Proactive, cooperative conservation measures could be a model for protections across the West

    The following statement can be attributed to Nada Culver, senior director of agency policy and planning for The Wilderness Society, regarding the Department of Interior’s decision to not add the bi-state greater sage grouse population to the Endangered Species List.