Proposed Projects

America’s public lands will soon host many wind and solar energy projects proposed to the government. We’re working to make sure those projects do not harm sensitive wildlands and wildlife habitat.

By getting involved in renewable energy projects, The Wilderness Society can:

  • Help improve good proposals
  • Help steer bad proposals away from our best wildlands
  • Ensure sensitive wildlife habitats aren’t harmed by renewable energy infrastructure and activities

The rapid increase in companies applying to build wind and solar projects and transmission lines on public lands demonstrates a great move towards creating a clean energy future — but these projects can harm our natural heritage.

By working with conservation partners, project developers, land managers like the BLM and the forest service and others, we can protect wildlands while transitioning away from polluting fossil fuels.

Protecting key wild lands and wildlife habitat from development

Our wildest lands and sensitive wildlife habitat are inappropriate for development of any kind. When renewable energy projects are proposed in these locations, we work to steer developers to more appropriate places or block bad proposals if alternative solutions cannot be found.

Improving project proposals to limit impacts and maximize benefits

Even when projects are proposed in areas that are generally appropriate, we can often help gain improvements by recommending changes to the proposed project footprint or technology. Reducing impacts while maximizing clean energy output from project sites are important elements of responsible renewable energy development.

Proposed projects we are engaged in

The Wilderness Society is engaged in a number of proposed projects across the nation. More information on key projects is found on the regional projects pages below:

  • The 114th Congress faces a multitude of environmental challenges. The Wilderness Society is working the halls of power to make sure that America's wild places are part of the legislative agenda, and to make sure that lawmakers and staff are hearing both sides of the issues.

  • Every year, a coalition of conservation and environmental groups produce a report to help Congress as it debates the federal budget for the year. This report, has typically been to referred to as the "Green Budget." This year, it illustrates the importance of reinvesting in conservation and natural resources programs for Fiscal Year 2016 and outlines dozens of examples of programs that have been shortchanged in recent years. 

  • 2014 Audited Financial Statements