Proposed Projects

America’s public lands will soon host many wind and solar energy projects proposed to the government. We’re working to make sure those projects do not harm sensitive wildlands and wildlife habitat.

By getting involved in renewable energy projects, The Wilderness Society can:

  • Help improve good proposals
  • Help steer bad proposals away from our best wildlands
  • Ensure sensitive wildlife habitats aren’t harmed by renewable energy infrastructure and activities

The rapid increase in companies applying to build wind and solar projects and transmission lines on public lands demonstrates a great move towards creating a clean energy future — but these projects can harm our natural heritage.

By working with conservation partners, project developers, land managers like the BLM and the forest service and others, we can protect wildlands while transitioning away from polluting fossil fuels.

Protecting key wild lands and wildlife habitat from development

Our wildest lands and sensitive wildlife habitat are inappropriate for development of any kind. When renewable energy projects are proposed in these locations, we work to steer developers to more appropriate places or block bad proposals if alternative solutions cannot be found.

Improving project proposals to limit impacts and maximize benefits

Even when projects are proposed in areas that are generally appropriate, we can often help gain improvements by recommending changes to the proposed project footprint or technology. Reducing impacts while maximizing clean energy output from project sites are important elements of responsible renewable energy development.

Proposed projects we are engaged in

The Wilderness Society is engaged in a number of proposed projects across the nation. More information on key projects is found on the regional projects pages below:

  • Map and infographics showing the region of the plan, what matters in the Pacific Northwestt (1), what people want in a Northwest Forest Plan (2) and what most voters support in a revised Northwest Forest plan (3). A two page summary of the polls results is below the map and infographics.

  • statewide survey of 600 registered voters in Washington, Oregon and California, with an additional oversample of 200 registered voters in California counties, was conducted by telephone using professional interviewers, including 45% of all interviews conducted via cell phone.

  • “We Can’t Wait: Why we need reform of the federal coal program now,” shows how the industry has been passing on millions in costs every day to the public. The status quo of the program has impacted public lands to the tune of billions of dollars and could multiply if coal companies aren’t held responsible for cleanup as they go bankrupt. Damages due to climate change from mining emissions will cost billions and drinking water for entire cities could be lost to mining or polluted beyond safe drinking levels.