Recreation Funding

One of the ways The Wilderness Society promotes recreation on public lands is to work for more funding for recreation programs run by the federal government.

The amount of federal money available for recreation has a big impact on the quality of the recreation experiences for Americans.

This money pays for:

  • Trail maintenance
  • Recreation facilities
  • Other recreation-related costs on lands run by agencies, such as the U.S. Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management

The Wilderness Society works for adequate funding for recreation programs because recreation programs:

  • Connect people to the outdoors
  • Provide a higher quality of life
  • Stimulate the active outdoor recreation economy.

Funding for federal land management agencies has been relatively flat through 2012 and big funding cuts are expected in the future.

Forest Recreation Funding

More than 50,000 people recreate on national forest trails every year. Funding these trails is critical for upkeep and to keep our outdoor recreation economy booming. 

Funding for Recreation on BLM Lands

Americans love the western lands managed by the Bureau of Land Management and they would recreate more on BLM lands if only there were more trails. We're working to expand the system so more people can enjoy the wonders of our unique western wildlands. 

Read more about our work on the recreation budgets of the U.S. Forest Service and the Bureau of Land Management.

  • Michael Reinemer

    As the Obama Administration draws to a close, we recognize President Obama's accomplishments in land conservation, energy reforms, efforts to help more Americans visit our great outdoors and honoring America’s diverse culture and history.

  • Anastasia Greene

    Yesterday on Capitol Hill, Representative Ryan Zinke appeared before the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee to answer questions at his confirmation hearing to serve as Secretary of the Interior.

    The Wilderness Society president, Jamie Williams issued the following statement:

    “It was heartening to see Ryan Zinke voice his strong support for our parks and other public lands, but at the same time he questioned settled science around climate change and called for the rollback of the BLM's new rule to curb natural gas waste.

  • Anastasia Greene

    After a ten-year environmental review with record public involvement, today the Forest Service issued its final decision to not lease 40,000 acres of sprawling wild lands in Wyoming’s Bridger-Teton National Forest.