Recreation Funding

One of the ways The Wilderness Society promotes recreation on public lands is to work for more funding for recreation programs run by the federal government.

The amount of federal money available for recreation has a big impact on the quality of the recreation experiences for Americans.

This money pays for:

  • Trail maintenance
  • Recreation facilities
  • Other recreation-related costs on lands run by agencies, such as the U.S. Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management

The Wilderness Society works for adequate funding for recreation programs because recreation programs:

  • Connect people to the outdoors
  • Provide a higher quality of life
  • Stimulate the active outdoor recreation economy.

Funding for federal land management agencies has been relatively flat through 2012 and big funding cuts are expected in the future.

Forest Recreation Funding

More than 50,000 people recreate on national forest trails every year. Funding these trails is critical for upkeep and to keep our outdoor recreation economy booming. 

Funding for Recreation on BLM Lands

Americans love the western lands managed by the Bureau of Land Management and they would recreate more on BLM lands if only there were more trails. We're working to expand the system so more people can enjoy the wonders of our unique western wildlands. 

Read more about our work on the recreation budgets of the U.S. Forest Service and the Bureau of Land Management.

  • Neil Shader

    A report on landscape-based mitigation released by the Interior Department Energy and Climate Change Task Force, “A Strategy for Improving the Mitigation Policies and Practices of The Department of the Interior,”  provides a blueprint for better protection for fish, wildlife, recreation and wild land values for the tens of millions of acres of public lands open to oil and gas and other energy development.

  • Michael Reinemer

    This weekend, veterans from around the West will be visiting the rolling, boulder-strewn landscape of the Dragoon Mountains south of Tucson to participate in a writing workshop that will guide them on skills needed to create narratives of fiction, non-fiction, or poetry that is informed both by their service experiences and the natural environment.

  • Neil Shader

    The following statement on the confirmation of Neil Kornze to be the Director of the Bureau of Land Management can be attributed to Jamie Williams, president of The Wilderness Society.