Recreation Funding

One of the ways The Wilderness Society promotes recreation on public lands is to work for more funding for recreation programs run by the federal government.

The amount of federal money available for recreation has a big impact on the quality of the recreation experiences for Americans.

This money pays for:

  • Trail maintenance
  • Recreation facilities
  • Other recreation-related costs on lands run by agencies, such as the U.S. Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management

The Wilderness Society works for adequate funding for recreation programs because recreation programs:

  • Connect people to the outdoors
  • Provide a higher quality of life
  • Stimulate the active outdoor recreation economy.

Funding for federal land management agencies has been relatively flat through 2012 and big funding cuts are expected in the future.

Forest Recreation Funding

More than 50,000 people recreate on national forest trails every year. Funding these trails is critical for upkeep and to keep our outdoor recreation economy booming. 

Funding for Recreation on BLM Lands

Americans love the western lands managed by the Bureau of Land Management and they would recreate more on BLM lands if only there were more trails. We're working to expand the system so more people can enjoy the wonders of our unique western wildlands. 

Read more about our work on the recreation budgets of the U.S. Forest Service and the Bureau of Land Management.

  • Testimony delivered by The Wilderness Society's Chase Huntley to the House Natural Resources Committee Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources

  • A letter to Members of the House of Representatives urging them to oppose HR 4899, a bill that would undermine important wildland protections and force drilling in pristine areas of the National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska

  • Every year, a coalition of conservation and environmental groups produce a report to help Congress as it debates the federal budget for the year. This report, has typically been to referred to as the "Green Budget." This year, it is titled "Green Investments," and it illustrates the importance of reinvesting in conservation and natural resources programs for Fiscal Year 2015 by looking at some of the effects of recent budget cuts.