Recreation Funding

One of the ways The Wilderness Society promotes recreation on public lands is to work for more funding for recreation programs run by the federal government.

The amount of federal money available for recreation has a big impact on the quality of the recreation experiences for Americans.

This money pays for:

  • Trail maintenance
  • Recreation facilities
  • Other recreation-related costs on lands run by agencies, such as the U.S. Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management

The Wilderness Society works for adequate funding for recreation programs because recreation programs:

  • Connect people to the outdoors
  • Provide a higher quality of life
  • Stimulate the active outdoor recreation economy.

Funding for federal land management agencies has been relatively flat through 2012 and big funding cuts are expected in the future.

Forest Recreation Funding

More than 50,000 people recreate on national forest trails every year. Funding these trails is critical for upkeep and to keep our outdoor recreation economy booming. 

Funding for Recreation on BLM Lands

Americans love the western lands managed by the Bureau of Land Management and they would recreate more on BLM lands if only there were more trails. We're working to expand the system so more people can enjoy the wonders of our unique western wildlands. 

Read more about our work on the recreation budgets of the U.S. Forest Service and the Bureau of Land Management.

  • Comments from The Wilderness Society, Natural Resources Defense Council, and others submitted to the Bureau of Land Management regarding proposed rules for leasing land for wind and solar energy projects on federal lands. 

  • The 114th Congress faces a multitude of environmental challenges. The Wilderness Society is working the halls of power to make sure that America's wild places are part of the legislative agenda, and to make sure that lawmakers and staff are hearing both sides of the issues.

  • The Wilderness Society submitted official comments on the draft Desert Renewable Energy Conservation plan that was proposed early in the fall of 2014. The comment period allowed for broad public participation in determining the future of balancing conservation and recreation with renewable energy development.

    The following is an excerpt from our comments submitted on February 22, 2015. The full comment document is available for download.