Recreation Trails

America’s trails are a great way to experience nature, and there are hundreds of thousands of miles of them on our wildlands.

Why recreation trails

Trails are not only the way most people connect with nature, they also add to America’s outdoor recreation economy. We work to make sure trails are maintained and protected.

Keeping trails open

The hundreds of thousands of miles of trails on wildlands all need to be kept up. Not only do closed trails stop people from getting where they want to go, but they can harm surrounding lands and waters.

National Forest trails

Within our national forests are trails that allow people to connect with and experience nature. The US Forest Service is making outdoor recreation a higher priority.

Trails on Bureau of Land Management lands

Bureau of Land Management (BLM) lands do not have many trails for hiking, horseback riding or bicycling. At Wilderness, we’re working to make trail recreation a priority for the BLM.

 

  • In the first of a three management plans to be released in 2015, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) in Colorado missed a great opportunity to protect some of Colorado's most treasured landscapes—including the Dolores River, lands surrounding Mesa Verde National Park and recreation hub

  • When school was out for the summer in the suburbs of Manhattan where I grew up, my mom packed our little Subaru hatchback with sleeping bags, a tent, a cooler filled with fruit and sandwich meat, hiking boots, rain gear, and three kids, and headed West.  Like generations before and since, w

  • The Forest Service recently released a plan that could protect much of Colorado’s Thompson Divide from new oil and gas leasing. For years, this spectacular area has been threatened by oil and gas development.