Recreation Trails

America’s trails are a great way to experience nature, and there are hundreds of thousands of miles of them on our wildlands.

Why recreation trails

Trails are not only the way most people connect with nature, they also add to America’s outdoor recreation economy. We work to make sure trails are maintained and protected.

Keeping trails open

The hundreds of thousands of miles of trails on wildlands all need to be kept up. Not only do closed trails stop people from getting where they want to go, but they can harm surrounding lands and waters.

National Forest trails

Within our national forests are trails that allow people to connect with and experience nature. The US Forest Service is making outdoor recreation a higher priority.

Trails on Bureau of Land Management lands

Bureau of Land Management (BLM) lands do not have many trails for hiking, horseback riding or bicycling. At Wilderness, we’re working to make trail recreation a priority for the BLM.

 

  • DJ Tyson

    Today, Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke addressed a meeting of the Western Governors Association in Montana. In response, Nada Culver, senior director of agency policy at The Wilderness Society said:

  • Michael Reinemer

    ANCHORAGE, ALASKA (June 27, 2017) – Today the U.S. House Committee on Natural Resources voted in favor of H.R. 218, a bill that would allow construction of an unnecessary road through a designated wilderness area in Alaska’s Izembek National Wildlife Refuge. In response, The Wilderness Society issues the following statement from Alaska Regional Director Nicole Whittington-Evans:

  • Kate Mackay

    Today the House Natural Resources Committee marked up and passed H.R. 2936, the “Resilient Federal Forests Act of 2017,” which opens America’s national forests and roadless areas to expedited logging—a direct attack on the nation’s last old growth stands, clean drinking water for millions and quiet habitat for wildlife.