Recreation Trails

America’s trails are a great way to experience nature, and there are hundreds of thousands of miles of them on our wildlands.

Why recreation trails

Trails are not only the way most people connect with nature, they also add to America’s outdoor recreation economy. We work to make sure trails are maintained and protected.

Keeping trails open

The hundreds of thousands of miles of trails on wildlands all need to be kept up. Not only do closed trails stop people from getting where they want to go, but they can harm surrounding lands and waters.

National Forest trails

Within our national forests are trails that allow people to connect with and experience nature. The US Forest Service is making outdoor recreation a higher priority.

Trails on Bureau of Land Management lands

Bureau of Land Management (BLM) lands do not have many trails for hiking, horseback riding or bicycling. At Wilderness, we’re working to make trail recreation a priority for the BLM.

 

  • Michael Reinemer

    Rather than using taxpayer dollars, the program’s funds come from a small slice of royalties from oil and gas leases in publicly owned offshore waters. 

    The 2017 budget would invest $900 million for conservation and recreation projects, which is the annual amount authorized by the 1964 bill that created this popular program. However, actual funding approved by Congress has traditionally fallen far short of that amount. 

    Alan Rowsome at The Wilderness Society commented:

  • Anonymous

    “The proposed guidelines from the Bureau of Land Management governing natural gas waste are a huge step forward toward ensuring public resources on federal lands are used for Americans’ benefit, and not wasted.

    “For too long, oil and gas companies have been able to vent and flare unlimited quantities of natural gas and ignore massive leaks from outdated infrastructure. These unregulated actions have immense consequences for American taxpayers, who lose out on more than $330 million annually from gas that is not being sold.

  • Jennifer Dickson

    The 2016 Utah Public Lands Initiative (PLI) draft released by Utah Representative Rob Bishop fails to provide adequate protections for scenic public lands in the state, would undermine bedrock environmental laws and threatens to despoil key public lands.