Recreation Trails

America’s trails are a great way to experience nature, and there are hundreds of thousands of miles of them on our wildlands.

Why recreation trails

Trails are not only the way most people connect with nature, they also add to America’s outdoor recreation economy. We work to make sure trails are maintained and protected.

Keeping trails open

The hundreds of thousands of miles of trails on wildlands all need to be kept up. Not only do closed trails stop people from getting where they want to go, but they can harm surrounding lands and waters.

National Forest trails

Within our national forests are trails that allow people to connect with and experience nature. The US Forest Service is making outdoor recreation a higher priority.

Trails on Bureau of Land Management lands

Bureau of Land Management (BLM) lands do not have many trails for hiking, horseback riding or bicycling. At Wilderness, we’re working to make trail recreation a priority for the BLM.

 

  • Michael Reinemer

    Strayed will receive the We Are the Wild Inspiration Award, which recognizes a person who embodies the spirit of wilderness and its transformative power.

    Jamie Williams, president of The Wilderness Society, said, “In this 50th anniversary year of the Wilderness Act, we present this award to underscore the importance of inspiring people to discover and care for our wild lands. Today we honor Cheryl Strayed for her remarkable story and for inspiring new generations to experience wilderness, which forms the backbone of the American spirit.”

  • Michael Reinemer

    President Obama will use his executive authority to create the San Gabriel Mountains National Monument, an action that will improve outdoor recreation, safeguard vital water supplies and protect wildlife in the backyard of Los Angeles – the nation’s most populous county.

  • Michael Reinemer

    The Wilderness Society applauds the Obama Administration for advancing bipartisan efforts to further protect ocean ecosystems and their scientific value by using the Antiquities Act to expand the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument, an undisturbed island and atoll chain located 1,000 miles southwest of Hawaii. The proclamation builds on the approximately 83,000 square-mile national monument initially designated by President George W. Bush in 2009.