Recreation Trails

America’s trails are a great way to experience nature, and there are hundreds of thousands of miles of them on our wildlands.

Why recreation trails

Trails are not only the way most people connect with nature, they also add to America’s outdoor recreation economy. We work to make sure trails are maintained and protected.

Keeping trails open

The hundreds of thousands of miles of trails on wildlands all need to be kept up. Not only do closed trails stop people from getting where they want to go, but they can harm surrounding lands and waters.

National Forest trails

Within our national forests are trails that allow people to connect with and experience nature. The US Forest Service is making outdoor recreation a higher priority.

Trails on Bureau of Land Management lands

Bureau of Land Management (BLM) lands do not have many trails for hiking, horseback riding or bicycling. At Wilderness, we’re working to make trail recreation a priority for the BLM.

 

  • Testimony delivered by The Wilderness Society's Chase Huntley to the House Natural Resources Committee Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources

  • A letter to Members of the House of Representatives urging them to oppose HR 4899, a bill that would undermine important wildland protections and force drilling in pristine areas of the National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska

  • Every year, a coalition of conservation and environmental groups produce a report to help Congress as it debates the federal budget for the year. This report, has typically been to referred to as the "Green Budget." This year, it is titled "Green Investments," and it illustrates the importance of reinvesting in conservation and natural resources programs for Fiscal Year 2015 by looking at some of the effects of recent budget cuts.