Shoshone Forest

The wild Shoshone National Forest borders Yellowstone National Park to the east. It is the nation’s first national forest and one of the least developed.

The Wilderness Society’s work here focuses on preserving designated wilderness, preventing destruction by roads and drilling and strengthening the local economy by maintaining the forest’s unique, wild character.

Why the Shoshone National Forest

The Shoshone National Forest is uniquely wild and scenic. It supports abundant wildlife and a strong local economy based on hunting, fishing, recreation and tourism.

Work we’re doing

More than half of the Shoshone is designated as wilderness. Another 30% is roadless and pristine. We’re defending these wild lands against reckless development and road building.

Our partners

We are working with outdoor businesses and enthusiasts to maintain wilderness and roadless protections in the Shoshone.

  • Tim Woody

    President Barack Obama is expected to visit Anchorage, Alaska on Monday, where according to the White House he will address the State Department's GLACIER conference focused on a conversation around the Arctic and climate change. His visit to communities nearby will allow him to see first-hand the impacts that Native villagers and Alaskan communities are facing on a daily basis.

  • Michael Reinemer

    Senator Cantwell, the ranking member of the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee, has scheduled a hearing in Seattle on August 27 to examine wildfire issues.  Senator John Barrasso, who chairs that committee’s Public Lands, Forests and Mining subcommittee, is also scheduled to participate in the hearing.

  • Tim Woody

    When President Obama visits Alaska at the end of August, climate change will be a key focus of his trip. The Wilderness Society developed the following memo to provide a brief primer on key Alaska public lands where the effects of climate change can already be seen. This information is intended to ease your research and inform your reporting during the president’s visit. It focuses on four areas where the president’s administration has made major, important decisions: