Shoshone Forest

The wild Shoshone National Forest borders Yellowstone National Park to the east. It is the nation’s first national forest and one of the least developed.

The Wilderness Society’s work here focuses on preserving designated wilderness, preventing destruction by roads and drilling and strengthening the local economy by maintaining the forest’s unique, wild character.

Why the Shoshone National Forest

The Shoshone National Forest is uniquely wild and scenic. It supports abundant wildlife and a strong local economy based on hunting, fishing, recreation and tourism.

Work we’re doing

More than half of the Shoshone is designated as wilderness. Another 30% is roadless and pristine. We’re defending these wild lands against reckless development and road building.

Our partners

We are working with outdoor businesses and enthusiasts to maintain wilderness and roadless protections in the Shoshone.

  • Michael Reinemer

    “The Wilderness Society applauds the actions by Senators Martin Heinrich and Tom Udall to introduce and guide the Cerros del Norte Conservation Act forward,“ said Michael Casaus, New Mexico Director with The Wilderness Society in Albuquerque. “Designating these two unique areas contained within the Río Grande del Norte National Monument as official wilderness ensures these wild and diverse landscapes that are so important to local communities receive the government’s highest level of protection.”

  • Michael Reinemer

    The Wilderness Society released the following statement regarding passage of Rep. Mike Simpson’s bill to protect the Boulder-White Cloud mountains out of the U.S. House of Representatives:

  • Michael Reinemer

    The Wilderness Society applauds progress toward reauthorization of the nation’s most important conservation program, the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF), a 50-year-old law that has invested in parks, trails, historic sites, and ball fields in virtually every county in the U.S.