Shoshone Forest

The wild Shoshone National Forest borders Yellowstone National Park to the east. It is the nation’s first national forest and one of the least developed.

The Wilderness Society’s work here focuses on preserving designated wilderness, preventing destruction by roads and drilling and strengthening the local economy by maintaining the forest’s unique, wild character.

Why the Shoshone National Forest

The Shoshone National Forest is uniquely wild and scenic. It supports abundant wildlife and a strong local economy based on hunting, fishing, recreation and tourism.

Work we’re doing

More than half of the Shoshone is designated as wilderness. Another 30% is roadless and pristine. We’re defending these wild lands against reckless development and road building.

Our partners

We are working with outdoor businesses and enthusiasts to maintain wilderness and roadless protections in the Shoshone.

  • Jennifer Dickson

    During its history, the state of Idaho has sold off more than 1.7 million acres of land to private interests, according to an analysis of land sale data by The Wilderness Society released this week.

  • Michael Reinemer

    On Bureau of Land Management (BLM) lands and National Forests, the agencies are mismanaging the use of off-road vehicles (ORVs) such as dirt bikes, snowmobiles, and all-terrain vehicles, resulting in unnecessary damage to watersheds and wildlife, and conflict with other recreationists. This is in spite of a long-standing legal obligation dating back to the 1970s that requires federal land agencies to minimize such damage and conflict.

  • Michael Reinemer

    Development of natural areas in the United States, coupled with expected changes in climate, have increased the importance of migration corridors that connect protected natural areas. Large, connected wild lands reduce the isolation of animal and plant populations and allow for migration and movement that can help preserve populations of wild species and enhance genetic and ecosystem diversity.