Sierra Nevada

The Sierra Nevada is California’s magnificent backbone. Its incomparable wild lands – home of Yosemite and Sequoia parks – still need protection, restoration and wise management.

Immortalized by Ansel Adams’ iconic photos, the Sierra Nevada dazzles with snow-capped peaks, sapphire lakes and ancient sequoia that have guarded it for millennia. Now this American treasure needs us to guard its wild lands and permanently restore its legacy.

Yosemite. Sequoia. Mt. Whitney. They are some of the iconic places that make the Sierra an American landmark like no other.

Yet there’s also magic in more subtle outdoor experiences:  remote cathedral peaks glimmering with alpenglow or a bear family scampering across a wildflower meadow.

Visitors from around the world also visit the Sierra Nevada for its trout-rich streams, winter sports and ancient sequoia forests where some trees are thousands of years old.

Why the Sierra Nevada?

With more than 12 million acres of federal public land, the Sierra Nevada is a vast and diverse range, extending 400 miles from north to south.

But the Sierra’s raw beauty faces threats such as:

  • Development
  • Heavy recreation use including off-road vehicles
  • Mining and other commercial businesses
  • Climate change
  • California’s 38 million residents

Work we’re doing

The Wilderness Society California team is focused on preserving key wilderness for recreation, wildlife and water supplies.

Our other goals are to:

  • Help develop forest management plans to improve their health.
  • Restore thousands of acres that will improve wildlife habitat, safeguard water supplies, lower wildfire risk and boost local tourism.
  • Improve forest health by identifying illegal or eroding dirt roads that can be reclaimed by nature.

Our partners

The California team is working with its local and national partners on the above projects.

  • Michael Reinemer

    The Wilderness Society praises Congress for passing the Hill Creek Cultural Preservation and Energy Development Act (H.R. 356 / S. 27). The legislation provides for the exchange of roughly 20,000 acres of Utah’s mineral rights from ecologically and culturally sensitive lands in the Desolation Canyon region of the Uintah and Ouray Reservation for federal mineral rights in another part of the reservation.

  • Michael Reinemer

    The draft House Interior and Environment Appropriations bill released today is a clear improvement from previous years, though it still misses the mark on several key conservation, climate and public lands needs and is laden with numerous policy provisions or “riders” that have no place in the appropriations process.

  • Michael Reinemer

    On Wednesday, The Wilderness Society presented lifetime conservation achievement awards to Representatives George Miller, Jim Moran and Rush Holt, who collectively represent 80 years of support for conservation of some of America’s most stunning landscapes and protection of the country’s clean air and water.  All three members of Congress have announced their plans to retire at the end of the current session.

    Rep. George Miller (California – 11th District)