Southeastern Utah

Southeastern Utah is home to some of the most inspiring and significant landscapes in the West, including red rock canyons and juniper dotted mesas.

However, more than 15 million acres of southeastern Utah’s magnificent lands and wildlife habitat are vulnerable to oil and gas development. The Wilderness Society is working to keep these uniquely American landscapes out of harm’s way.

Why Southeastern Utah

Home to stunning places like Arches and Canyonlands national parks, Southeastern Utah has many special lands that need to be protected.

Our work in Southeastern Utah

Our campaigns work to keep the most special wild areas permanently protected and to keep oil and gas drilling away from pristine areas. Our successes include protecting Grand Staircase-Escalante as a national monument.

Our partners

We could not accomplish our conservation goals without the groups and communities that we work with in the state of Utah.
 

  • Michael Reinemer

    More than 50 million acres of Bureau of Land Management Land could include more conservation measures to help sage-grouse, based on plans announced by Interior Secretary Sally Jewell today in Cheyenne, Wyoming.  The plan released for Idaho is meant to pair the protection of sage-grouse habitat with other multiple use management of public lands. If implemented correctly, this plan can create more certainty for Idaho ranchers while also making a significant commitment to conserve sage-grouse habitat.

  • Anastasia Greene

    The future of more than 50 million acres of Bureau of Land Management Land could include more conservation measures based on plans announced by Interior Secretary Sally Jewell today.  When adopted and implemented, the federal plans for managing the conservation of Greater Sage-Grouse could complement the broad number of efforts already underway across the West and highlight a commitment to conservation that is needed from the Interior Department.

  • Michael Reinemer

    Citing some of “the most beautiful and iconic landscapes on earth” in Teton County’s backyard, the board of commissioners Tuesday morning unanimously passed a resolution that “opposes any and all efforts by the State of Wyoming to obtain the wholesale transfer of federal lands in Wyoming” to the state. In January, Sweetwater County filed a letter with the state legislature stating similar opposition to measures that would turn over federal public lands—such as parks, wilderness, and national forests—to state jurisdiction and management.