Southern Appalachian Wilderness Stewards

The great hiking trails in the wild areas of the Southern Appalachians need dedicated volunteers to clear brush, repair storm damage and keep them open to visitors.

The Wilderness Society is proud to sponsor SAWS: Southern Appalachian Wilderness Stewards. This group is dedicated to keeping trails open in designated wilderness areas across the Southeast.

About the Southern Appalachian Wilderness Stewards

The Southern Appalachian Wilderness Stewards are dedicated to providing stewardship to wilderness areas in the Southern Appalachians region and are engaged in a variety of activities.

Where we work

SAWS works to maintain trails in designated wilderness areas and Wilderness Study Areas. Find out more about these places in the Southeast United States.

Wilderness Rangers

If you are out in a wilderness area in the Southern Appalachians, you might run into one of the Wilderness Rangers. The Wilderness Rangers roam the wild lands, making sure trails are maintained and that the wilderness stays wild.

Get Involved

There are plenty of opportunities to get involved with the Southern Appalachian Wilderness Stewards. If you are interested in lending a hand while you hike, find out more.
 

  • cate tanenbaum

    Wilderness Society applauds House for moving beyond ‘gridlock’ but says new amendments lead legislation astray

    The Wilderness Society today praised the House Natural Resources Comamittee for advancing Wilderness designations for Washington state and Nevada but worries House legislation departs too significantly from more locally supported counterpart bills in the Senate. 

  • Neil Shader

    The following statement can be attributed to Chase Huntley, senior government relation director for The Wilderness Society. Chase was invited to testify before the House Natural Resources Committee Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources on H.R. 596 and H.R. 1363.

  • Neil Shader

    The first is the “Advancing Conservation and Education Act of 2014,” from Rep. Rob Bishop (Utah) and Rep. Peter DeFazio (Oregon), which would expedite transfers of land between states and federal agencies.