Southwestern Crown

Montana’s Southwestern Crown is threatened by decades of mismanagement. We are leading an effort to ensure we leave it better than we found it.

The Southwestern Crown forms the southwestern boundary of the spectacular Bob Marshall Wilderness but its forests and streams have gradually been degraded for a century. The future of this place depends on fixing the broken parts and protecting the working ones. 

Why the Southwestern Crown?

In an era of climate change, the Southwestern Crown is a crucial piece of a fully connected and more resilient wild landscape.

Work we’re doing

We bring the wild back to forests that have lost it and permanently protect those that haven’t.

Our partners

We stitch together neighbors and new allies to advance conservation by recognizing and honoring their place on the land. 

  • Anastasia Greene

    The future of more than 50 million acres of Bureau of Land Management Land could include more conservation measures based on plans announced by Interior Secretary Sally Jewell today.  When adopted and implemented, the federal plans for managing the conservation of Greater Sage-Grouse could complement the broad number of efforts already underway across the West and highlight a commitment to conservation that is needed from the Interior Department.

  • Michael Reinemer

    Citing some of “the most beautiful and iconic landscapes on earth” in Teton County’s backyard, the board of commissioners Tuesday morning unanimously passed a resolution that “opposes any and all efforts by the State of Wyoming to obtain the wholesale transfer of federal lands in Wyoming” to the state. In January, Sweetwater County filed a letter with the state legislature stating similar opposition to measures that would turn over federal public lands—such as parks, wilderness, and national forests—to state jurisdiction and management.

  • Tim Woody

    In spite of Royal Dutch Shell’s disastrous performance during the 2012 Arctic Ocean drilling season, the federal Bureau of Ocean Energy Management today conditionally approved the company’s 2015 exploration plan, which provides even fewer safeguards for the Chukchi Sea and its sensitive coastline than Shell had in place three years ago. Shell also plans to bring a different rig operated by a new contractor to the Arctic Ocean in 2015, which could result in unexpected transport and drilling problems.