Stories from the Southern Appalachians

The Southern Appalachians are more than a landscape, they are a sanctuary and a way of life.

The Southern Appalachians are less than a day’s drive away for one-third of the nation. The wild forests of the Smokies are a home and a livelihood for many local residents who want to keep it that way for generations to come.

Bob's Story

Few families can claim to have deeper roots than those of the Plott family in the Southern Appalachians. Author, conservationist and wood carver Bob Plott still raises Plott hounds, which were first brought to the area by his great, great, great grandfather in 1750.

Scotty's Story

Scotty Bowman and his wife Laura live in an area surrounded by the Appalachian Mountains and Cherokee National Forest in northeastern Tennessee, where they are raising their three children.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Michael Reinemer

    Statement on Interior Department recommendation on Canyons of the Ancients National Monument, July 21, 2017

    The following statement is from Scott Miller, Southwest Senior Regional Director for the Wilderness Society:

  • Tim Woody

    By passing H.R. 218 today, the U.S. House of Representatives set a dangerous precedent, approving construction of a destructive, unnecessary road through protected wilderness in the vital Izembek National Wildlife Refuge in the Alaska Peninsula.  

    This bill undermines bedrock conservation laws including the 1964 Wilderness Act, which prevents road building in designated wilderness, and the National Environmental Policy Act, which guarantees a process for environmental review of federal decisions, including participation by citizens and other stakeholders. 

  • Alex Thompson

    Today the U.S. Senate held a procedural vote for Interior’s deputy secretary nomination of David Bernhardt.

    The former California lobbyist and high-ranking staffer at Interior under President George W. Bush has a longstanding history with oil and gas companies, having pushed for the removal of impediments to drilling in land use plans and advancing energy development in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge.

    The Wilderness Society issued the following statement from Melyssa Watson, vice president for conservation: