Take Action

When wilderness is faced with threats, we count on our passionate community to take action. Only through our collective action can we protect wildlands and ensure they remain safe.

There are many ways you can get involved.

Join our WildAlert network

Help stop drilling in the Arctic Ocean. Help stop mining in the Grand Canyon. These are the kinds of causes you can take action on when you join our WildAlert network.

Our email WildAlert subscribers are the first to hear about important campaigns, victories and features related to enjoying and protecting wilderness.

We send out regular notices for you to take action on important issues and add your voice to important wilderness causes. We also send ideas, tips and other features to help you get out and enjoy wildlands.

Magnificent Seven

Discover the Magnificent Seven, the seven most endangered wildlands in America. Spread the word by telling your friends and family about these threatened places.

Wilderness Under Siege

See our state-by-state map of a wave of anti-wilderness bills in Congress that threaten American wildands. Use our form to send an email to your representatives about saying "no" to Wilderness Under Siege.

See all open actions

Take action on a variety of issues, from legislation moving in Congress to National Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management decisions.

Find your representatives

You can look up your Congressional representatives using our find your representatives tool.

  • Michael Reinemer
    To mark the 50th year since the signing of the Wilderness Act in 1964, the Getches-Wilkinson Center for Natural Resources, Energy and the Environment and The Wilderness Society will host a conference on September 4 and 5 at the University of Colorado Law School in Boulder. “Celebrating the Great Law: The Wilderness Act at 50” will feature prominent authors, professors, historians, activists and Colorado’s poet laureate.  
     
  • cate tanenbaum

    Wilderness Society applauds House for moving beyond ‘gridlock’ but says new amendments lead legislation astray

    The Wilderness Society today praised the House Natural Resources Comamittee for advancing Wilderness designations for Washington state and Nevada but worries House legislation departs too significantly from more locally supported counterpart bills in the Senate. 

  • Neil Shader

    The following statement can be attributed to Chase Huntley, senior government relation director for The Wilderness Society. Chase was invited to testify before the House Natural Resources Committee Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources on H.R. 596 and H.R. 1363.