Take Action

When wilderness is faced with threats, we count on our passionate community to take action. Only through our collective action can we protect wildlands and ensure they remain safe.

There are many ways you can get involved.

Join our WildAlert network

Help stop drilling in the Arctic Ocean. Help stop mining in the Grand Canyon. These are the kinds of causes you can take action on when you join our WildAlert network.

Our email WildAlert subscribers are the first to hear about important campaigns, victories and features related to enjoying and protecting wilderness.

We send out regular notices for you to take action on important issues and add your voice to important wilderness causes. We also send ideas, tips and other features to help you get out and enjoy wildlands.

Magnificent Seven

Discover the Magnificent Seven, the seven most endangered wildlands in America. Spread the word by telling your friends and family about these threatened places.

Wilderness Under Siege

See our state-by-state map of a wave of anti-wilderness bills in Congress that threaten American wildands. Use our form to send an email to your representatives about saying "no" to Wilderness Under Siege.

See all open actions

Take action on a variety of issues, from legislation moving in Congress to National Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management decisions.

Find your representatives

You can look up your Congressional representatives using our find your representatives tool.

  • Neil Shader

    A report on landscape-based mitigation released by the Interior Department Energy and Climate Change Task Force, “A Strategy for Improving the Mitigation Policies and Practices of The Department of the Interior,”  provides a blueprint for better protection for fish, wildlife, recreation and wild land values for the tens of millions of acres of public lands open to oil and gas and other energy development.

  • Michael Reinemer

    This weekend, veterans from around the West will be visiting the rolling, boulder-strewn landscape of the Dragoon Mountains south of Tucson to participate in a writing workshop that will guide them on skills needed to create narratives of fiction, non-fiction, or poetry that is informed both by their service experiences and the natural environment.

  • Neil Shader

    The following statement on the confirmation of Neil Kornze to be the Director of the Bureau of Land Management can be attributed to Jamie Williams, president of The Wilderness Society.