Things to Do

Do you love outdoor recreation? At Wilderness, we do too. So as conservationists, we want to ensure that our recreation activities have minimal impact on wilderness.

Our Insider Tips will help you enjoy outdoor recreation to the fullest, while protecting the wild places you love.

Backcountry journeys

Backcountry journeys take you away from civilization and into the deep heart of wilderness. Begin preparing for a new wilderness expedition now.

Camping

Camping, one of our favorite wilderness activities, provides affordable fun and the chance to really experience wilderness. Check out some tips on how to find and preserve your ideal camping spot.

Family-friendly fun

Outdoor recreation can help cultivate a child’s passion for wilderness. The experiences they have outdoors can also bond families and create special memories. Learn how to make nature fun for the whole family.

Great hiking

Leave the civilized world behind with a hike. Learn insider tips on day hikes, hiking vacations and night hiking.

Nature walking

Nature walking conveys many benefits: mental health, better concentration, and a chance to teach kids about nature. Learn how to make the most of your nature walks.

Quiet moments

There’s nothing like a tranquil moment in wilderness to calm your mind and enhance your awareness of nature. Learn how to find tranquil spots that nourish your soul.

Urban escapes

It’s all too easy to feel isolated from nature when you’re a city dweller. But outdoor recreation escapes are often closer than you think. Learn how to find and enjoy a much-needed dose of wilderness.

Wild adventures

Do you enjoy hearing the "whoosh" of whitewater rapids passing by? Or perhaps a high-altitude encounter with a sheer rock face is your thing. Get the inside scoop on enjoying wild recreation while protecting wilderness for future thrill-seekers.

Wildlife watching

Maximize your chances of winning the wildlife lottery--spotting that rare animal you hope to encounter --by using a few simple tips.

  • Michael Reinemer

    Development of natural areas in the United States, coupled with expected changes in climate, have increased the importance of migration corridors that connect protected natural areas. Large, connected wild lands reduce the isolation of animal and plant populations and allow for migration and movement that can help preserve populations of wild species and enhance genetic and ecosystem diversity. 

  • Sarah Graddy

    An analysis of more than 8,700 low-producing natural gas wells in two counties in the San Juan Basin, San Juan and Rio Arriba, determined that BLM’s rule will have little to no negative impact on these marginal wells.

    The results of the study indicate that the new rule—which aims to reduce waste from venting, flaring and leaks from oil and gas operations on public and tribal lands—will actually increase overall production and royalties paid to support vital services in the state of New Mexico.

  • Michael Reinemer

    The measure would permanently authorize the Land and Water Conservation Fund, protect two wilderness areas in New Mexico and address water supply and river restoration efforts in the Yakima Basin in Washington state.