Top Activities in the Wild

Summer is the best season for heading into the wild. Whether you're looking for a backcountry journey or some family-friendly fun, we've found some places that just might work for your next wild adventure.

Planning a trip to enjoy your favorite wild pastime? Here are a few activities we recommend:

Backcountry journeys

The most serious wilderness explorers will find plenty of backcountry to experience in places like the remote corners of Idaho or the canyons of southeastern Utah. 

Camping

Fall asleep in the cool forests of the east coast or alongside the crystal waters of Idaho's Clearwater Basin.

Family-friendly fun

When school lets out for the summer, there's nothing more fun than chasing salamanders in North Carolina or romping through Montana forests.

Great hiking

Whether it's day hiking or long-distance hiking you're looking for, you'll find miles of trails to wear in your boots in places like Montana’s Gallatin Range.

Nature walking

Wander through a bursting garden of beautiful desert plants in New Mexico and find other great places for nature walking.

Quiet moments

You can find lots of quiet moments in off-the-beaten-path wild places like red rock country in western Colorado and southeastern Utah.

Urban escapes

From California’s San Gabriel Mountains to New Hampshire’s White Mountain National Forest, these places offer a great getaway from the bustle of urban life.

Wild adventures

It doesn't get much wilder than Wyoming’s Shoshone National Forest — among the wildest, most rugged places left in America.

Wildlife watching

A trip to Alaska and the Arctic is the perfect place to see wildlife — caribou, migratory birds, whales, polar bears and more.

  • Anastasia Greene

    “We are disappointed to see that the President-elect has appointed a climate science skeptic who has pledged to rollback greenhouse gas reduction measures. Our nation faces unprecedented challenges from human-caused climate change, including our national parks and communities most vulnerable to drought, flooding and other effects.

  • Michael Reinemer

    As leaders of the U.S. environmental movement, we are mothers and fathers, daughters and sons, white, black, Latino, Asian, Native American, of many creeds, faiths and religions. We come from diverse backgrounds and near infinite preferences and beliefs. But above all, we are concerned individuals and concerned members of the human race.

  • Michael Reinemer
    “Today’s decision to halt the Dakota Access Pipeline and to call for a full environmental review of alternative routes is welcome and positive news,” said Jamie Williams, president of The Wilderness Society. “The Army Corps of Engineers is right to recognize that Native nations were not meaningfully consulted on a project with such high risks to their sovereign lands and drinking water.