Top Activities in the Wild

Summer is the best season for heading into the wild. Whether you're looking for a backcountry journey or some family-friendly fun, we've found some places that just might work for your next wild adventure.

Planning a trip to enjoy your favorite wild pastime? Here are a few activities we recommend:

Backcountry journeys

The most serious wilderness explorers will find plenty of backcountry to experience in places like the remote corners of Idaho or the canyons of southeastern Utah. 

Camping

Fall asleep in the cool forests of the east coast or alongside the crystal waters of Idaho's Clearwater Basin.

Family-friendly fun

When school lets out for the summer, there's nothing more fun than chasing salamanders in North Carolina or romping through Montana forests.

Great hiking

Whether it's day hiking or long-distance hiking you're looking for, you'll find miles of trails to wear in your boots in places like Montana’s Gallatin Range.

Nature walking

Wander through a bursting garden of beautiful desert plants in New Mexico and find other great places for nature walking.

Quiet moments

You can find lots of quiet moments in off-the-beaten-path wild places like red rock country in western Colorado and southeastern Utah.

Urban escapes

From California’s San Gabriel Mountains to New Hampshire’s White Mountain National Forest, these places offer a great getaway from the bustle of urban life.

Wild adventures

It doesn't get much wilder than Wyoming’s Shoshone National Forest — among the wildest, most rugged places left in America.

Wildlife watching

A trip to Alaska and the Arctic is the perfect place to see wildlife — caribou, migratory birds, whales, polar bears and more.

  • Michael Reinemer

    The Wilderness Society commends the Obama Administration for making history today by quadrupling the size of the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument, now the largest protected area in the world, measuring 582,578 square miles.

  • Michael Reinemer

    The Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument will be a unit of the National Park Service and was announced on the eve of the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service, which was established on August 25, 1916.

  • Max Greenberg

    The next fiscal year starts on Oct. 1, meaning that Congress is running out of time to cobble together "must-pass" appropriations legislation that will pay for the day-to-day expenses of the federal government.

    But in what has become a sad annual commentary on some leaders' dereliction of America's conservation tradition, the process is gummed up with counterproductive “riders” that have no place in the appropriations process, and would hurt wildlands right when they sorely need our help.