Top Activities in the Wild

Summer is the best season for heading into the wild. Whether you're looking for a backcountry journey or some family-friendly fun, we've found some places that just might work for your next wild adventure.

Planning a trip to enjoy your favorite wild pastime? Here are a few activities we recommend:

Backcountry journeys

The most serious wilderness explorers will find plenty of backcountry to experience in places like the remote corners of Idaho or the canyons of southeastern Utah. 

Camping

Fall asleep in the cool forests of the east coast or alongside the crystal waters of Idaho's Clearwater Basin.

Family-friendly fun

When school lets out for the summer, there's nothing more fun than chasing salamanders in North Carolina or romping through Montana forests.

Great hiking

Whether it's day hiking or long-distance hiking you're looking for, you'll find miles of trails to wear in your boots in places like Montana’s Gallatin Range.

Nature walking

Wander through a bursting garden of beautiful desert plants in New Mexico and find other great places for nature walking.

Quiet moments

You can find lots of quiet moments in off-the-beaten-path wild places like red rock country in western Colorado and southeastern Utah.

Urban escapes

From California’s San Gabriel Mountains to New Hampshire’s White Mountain National Forest, these places offer a great getaway from the bustle of urban life.

Wild adventures

It doesn't get much wilder than Wyoming’s Shoshone National Forest — among the wildest, most rugged places left in America.

Wildlife watching

A trip to Alaska and the Arctic is the perfect place to see wildlife — caribou, migratory birds, whales, polar bears and more.

  • BLM Planning 2.0 hearing support documents

  • 2015 Audited Financial Statements

  • This report describes how the U.S. government agency that oversees 700 million subsurface acres of oil and gas resources on nearly 250 million acres of public lands is saddled with outdated and unbalanced policies, often contradicting its own mandate to manage the land for multiple uses.

    90 percent of the public lands managed by the Bureau of Land Management is open to oil and gas leasing, even in areas with little or no potential for developing these resources, compromising potential for protecting wildlife and recreation, while encouraging speculative leasing.