Top Activities in the Wild

Summer is the best season for heading into the wild. Whether you're looking for a backcountry journey or some family-friendly fun, we've found some places that just might work for your next wild adventure.

Planning a trip to enjoy your favorite wild pastime? Here are a few activities we recommend:

Backcountry journeys

The most serious wilderness explorers will find plenty of backcountry to experience in places like the remote corners of Idaho or the canyons of southeastern Utah. 

Camping

Fall asleep in the cool forests of the east coast or alongside the crystal waters of Idaho's Clearwater Basin.

Family-friendly fun

When school lets out for the summer, there's nothing more fun than chasing salamanders in North Carolina or romping through Montana forests.

Great hiking

Whether it's day hiking or long-distance hiking you're looking for, you'll find miles of trails to wear in your boots in places like Montana’s Gallatin Range.

Nature walking

Wander through a bursting garden of beautiful desert plants in New Mexico and find other great places for nature walking.

Quiet moments

You can find lots of quiet moments in off-the-beaten-path wild places like red rock country in western Colorado and southeastern Utah.

Urban escapes

From California’s San Gabriel Mountains to New Hampshire’s White Mountain National Forest, these places offer a great getaway from the bustle of urban life.

Wild adventures

It doesn't get much wilder than Wyoming’s Shoshone National Forest — among the wildest, most rugged places left in America.

Wildlife watching

A trip to Alaska and the Arctic is the perfect place to see wildlife — caribou, migratory birds, whales, polar bears and more.

  • Map and infographics showing the region of the plan, what matters in the Pacific Northwestt (1), what people want in a Northwest Forest Plan (2) and what most voters support in a revised Northwest Forest plan (3). A two page summary of the polls results is below the map and infographics.

  • statewide survey of 600 registered voters in Washington, Oregon and California, with an additional oversample of 200 registered voters in California counties, was conducted by telephone using professional interviewers, including 45% of all interviews conducted via cell phone.

  • “We Can’t Wait: Why we need reform of the federal coal program now,” shows how the industry has been passing on millions in costs every day to the public. The status quo of the program has impacted public lands to the tune of billions of dollars and could multiply if coal companies aren’t held responsible for cleanup as they go bankrupt. Damages due to climate change from mining emissions will cost billions and drinking water for entire cities could be lost to mining or polluted beyond safe drinking levels.