Umbagog National Wildlife Refuge

A wildlife refuge on the border of Maine and New Hampshire, Umbagog is home to moose and many hiking and paddling opportunities.

Unfortunately, this wild area is threatened by sprawl, development and fragmenting wildlife habitat. The Wilderness Society works in and around the Umabagog National Wildlife Refuge to:

  • Expand its protected areas.
  • Protect endangered animals and plants.
  • Improve recreation opportunities in the Refuge.

Why Umbagog

A popular recreation spot and wildlife haven, the Umbagog National Wildlife Refuge is threatened by encroaching development.

Work we’re doing

The Wilderness Society and its partners are working to guarantee the long term protection of Umbagog.

Partners

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service manages the Umbagog National Wildlife Refuge.

  • Anastasia Greene

    “We are disappointed to see that the President-elect has appointed a climate science skeptic who has pledged to rollback greenhouse gas reduction measures. Our nation faces unprecedented challenges from human-caused climate change, including our national parks and communities most vulnerable to drought, flooding and other effects.

  • Michael Reinemer

    As leaders of the U.S. environmental movement, we are mothers and fathers, daughters and sons, white, black, Latino, Asian, Native American, of many creeds, faiths and religions. We come from diverse backgrounds and near infinite preferences and beliefs. But above all, we are concerned individuals and concerned members of the human race.

  • Michael Reinemer
    “Today’s decision to halt the Dakota Access Pipeline and to call for a full environmental review of alternative routes is welcome and positive news,” said Jamie Williams, president of The Wilderness Society. “The Army Corps of Engineers is right to recognize that Native nations were not meaningfully consulted on a project with such high risks to their sovereign lands and drinking water.