Umbagog National Wildlife Refuge

A wildlife refuge on the border of Maine and New Hampshire, Umbagog is home to moose and many hiking and paddling opportunities.

Unfortunately, this wild area is threatened by sprawl, development and fragmenting wildlife habitat. The Wilderness Society works in and around the Umabagog National Wildlife Refuge to:

  • Expand its protected areas.
  • Protect endangered animals and plants.
  • Improve recreation opportunities in the Refuge.

Why Umbagog

A popular recreation spot and wildlife haven, the Umbagog National Wildlife Refuge is threatened by encroaching development.

Work we’re doing

The Wilderness Society and its partners are working to guarantee the long term protection of Umbagog.

Partners

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service manages the Umbagog National Wildlife Refuge.

  • Michael Reinemer

    Development of natural areas in the United States, coupled with expected changes in climate, have increased the importance of migration corridors that connect protected natural areas. Large, connected wild lands reduce the isolation of animal and plant populations and allow for migration and movement that can help preserve populations of wild species and enhance genetic and ecosystem diversity. 

  • Sarah Graddy

    An analysis of more than 8,700 low-producing natural gas wells in two counties in the San Juan Basin, San Juan and Rio Arriba, determined that BLM’s rule will have little to no negative impact on these marginal wells.

    The results of the study indicate that the new rule—which aims to reduce waste from venting, flaring and leaks from oil and gas operations on public and tribal lands—will actually increase overall production and royalties paid to support vital services in the state of New Mexico.

  • Michael Reinemer

    The measure would permanently authorize the Land and Water Conservation Fund, protect two wilderness areas in New Mexico and address water supply and river restoration efforts in the Yakima Basin in Washington state.