Western North Carolina

Western North Carolina is home to a large portion of the Southern Appalachians and some of the wildest forests in the east.

Many of the forests in western North Carolina are free from roads that fragment habitat for plants and wildlife. They also are home to more than 2,000 kinds of plant and 700 kinds of animals.

The Nantahala-Pisgah National Forest occupy much of western North Carolina — covering over one million acres. These are the only two national forests in the state, and are within a days’ drive of more than one-third of the nation’s population.

Why Western North Carolina

The forests of Western North Carolina are a national treasure — attracting millions of visitors each year and helping to provide clean drinking water to local communities. Yet, they face many threats.

Work We Are Doing

Only 68,000 acres in the Nantahala-Pisgah National Forest are permanently protected. We're working to protect other portions of these vulnerable forests from logging and other pressures through our North Carolina Mountain Treasures Campaign.

Our Partners

With help from local partners, we’re able to do much more for the western North Carolina forests of the Greater Smokies region.
 

  • Tim Woody

    Alaska Gov. Bill Walker today announced that the U.S. Department of the Interior has granted the state permission to survey a potential road route through a designated wilderness area in Izembek National Wildlife Refuge for a boondoggle road project that would cost American taxpayers more than $80 million. In response, The Wilderness Society issues the following statement from its Alaska Regional Director, Nicole Whittington-Evans:

     

  • Tim Woody

    On the eve of the 40th anniversary of the trans-Alaska oil pipeline,  The Wilderness Society today released a report that debunks one of the primary arguments allies of the oil industry have put forward to promote drilling in one of America’s last pristine, untouched landscapes: Alaska’s Arctic National Wildlife Refuge.

  • Michael Reinemer

    Statement from Mike Anderson, senior policy analyst with The Wilderness Society:

    “This ill-advised and controversial legislation would greatly undermine longstanding public involvement opportunities and environmental safeguards for managing America’s public forest lands.