Western North Carolina

Western North Carolina is home to a large portion of the Southern Appalachians and some of the wildest forests in the east.

Many of the forests in western North Carolina are free from roads that fragment habitat for plants and wildlife. They also are home to more than 2,000 kinds of plant and 700 kinds of animals.

The Nantahala-Pisgah National Forest occupy much of western North Carolina — covering over one million acres. These are the only two national forests in the state, and are within a days’ drive of more than one-third of the nation’s population.

Why Western North Carolina

The forests of Western North Carolina are a national treasure — attracting millions of visitors each year and helping to provide clean drinking water to local communities. Yet, they face many threats.

Work We Are Doing

Only 68,000 acres in the Nantahala-Pisgah National Forest are permanently protected. We're working to protect other portions of these vulnerable forests from logging and other pressures through our North Carolina Mountain Treasures Campaign.

Our Partners

With help from local partners, we’re able to do much more for the western North Carolina forests of the Greater Smokies region.
 

  • Comments from The Wilderness Society, Natural Resources Defense Council, and others submitted to the Bureau of Land Management regarding proposed rules for leasing land for wind and solar energy projects on federal lands. 

  • The 114th Congress faces a multitude of environmental challenges. The Wilderness Society is working the halls of power to make sure that America's wild places are part of the legislative agenda, and to make sure that lawmakers and staff are hearing both sides of the issues.

  • The Wilderness Society submitted official comments on the draft Desert Renewable Energy Conservation plan that was proposed early in the fall of 2014. The comment period allowed for broad public participation in determining the future of balancing conservation and recreation with renewable energy development.

    The following is an excerpt from our comments submitted on February 22, 2015. The full comment document is available for download.