Why California

California is the nation’s most geographically diverse state and it has more than six million acres of potential wilderness. Protection of its wildlands is critical to buffer against climate change and population growth.

What's at stake

California is the nation’s most geographically diverse state – home to the highest and lowest points in the Lower 48 states, the most climate zones and species. Although it has 44 million acres of public land, it’s also the state with the most people.

From snow-capped mountain peaks to scenic Old West desert to classic coastal vistas, much of California is still wild. In fact, the state’s 15 million acres of wilderness is more than any other state except for Alaska.

What we're doing

The Golden State has another six and a half million acres of federal wild lands that can still be protected. The Wilderness Society is working across the state to preserve some of these amazing places.

The Wilderness Society is also restoring the forest to improve habitat and protect the creeks and rivers that are important water sources. We are keeping forests healthy by removing obsolete or illegal roads, encouraging sustainable forest management and working to battle climate change.

Successes

In the last decade, The Wilderness Society and its partners have permanently protected more than one million acres of California wilderness. The Wilderness Society was part of a successful legal agreement that will protect more than one million acres of Southern California forest.

  • cate tanenbaum

    Wilderness Society applauds House for moving beyond ‘gridlock’ but says new amendments lead legislation astray

    The Wilderness Society today praised the House Natural Resources Comamittee for advancing Wilderness designations for Washington state and Nevada but worries House legislation departs too significantly from more locally supported counterpart bills in the Senate. 

  • Neil Shader

    The following statement can be attributed to Chase Huntley, senior government relation director for The Wilderness Society. Chase was invited to testify before the House Natural Resources Committee Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources on H.R. 596 and H.R. 1363.

  • Neil Shader

    The first is the “Advancing Conservation and Education Act of 2014,” from Rep. Rob Bishop (Utah) and Rep. Peter DeFazio (Oregon), which would expedite transfers of land between states and federal agencies.