Wild Days of Summer

Summer has arrived and there’s no better time of year to celebrate the wild and beautiful places we love. Escape into the wild during these Wild Days of Summer.

The Wild Days of Summer are perfect for going on a hike, kayaking down a river or for doing nothing at all — just sitting and enjoying the beauty of the great outdoors. Whether you're exploring a new local park or vacationing in a new wild place you’ve never seen before, summer is a time for adventure.

Let us help you get started with your summer adventure with our Wild Days of Summer campaign.

Top experiences

From the icy blue Arctic waters to the rhododendron jungles of the Greater Smoky Mountains, we've got a list of top places and top activities in the wild that you won't want to miss.

Adopt your wild place

As Americans, we own a system of protected wildlands envied the world over. But these lands are far from safe — many face daily threats due to human use and development and natural threats like climate change.

Whether your favorite wild place is a cool New England forest or a red rock canyon in the southwest, they have something in common — they need your help.

Protect wilderness today by adopting one of these seven important landscapes:

Get the mywilderness Campfire Cookbook

Wilderness Society supporters shared their secrets for cooking up delicious meals around the campfire last year, and now the best of the best have been compiled in this ultimate recipe book for the GORP-loving gourmet. Get your complete copy.

  • Jennifer Dickson

    Despite major risks, obstacles and climate change concerns, the proposed plan would allow drilling for oil and gas in this remote, fragile and rapidly warming environment.

    The proposed Chukchi and Beaufort sea lease sales exclude relatively small areas where leasing would be prohibited.

  • Michael Reinemer

    The following statement is from Sally Miller, senior regional conservation representative with The Wilderness Society, regarding Representative Paul Cook’s introduction of legislation to create the Alabama Hills National Scenic Area and include it in the Bureau of Land Management’s system of National Conservation Lands:

  • Michael Reinemer

    Senators Mike Crapo, R-Idaho, and Ron Wyden, D-Ore., introduced the bill along with Republican Senators James Risch of Idaho, Cory Gardner of Colorado and Steve Daines of Montana as well as Democratic Senators Michael Bennet of Colorado, Tammy Baldwin of Wisconsin and Maria Cantwell of Washington.

    The bill would change how the federal government budgets for the suppression of wildfire disasters, to make it similar to the way other disasters are funded.