Wild Days of Summer

Summer has arrived and there’s no better time of year to celebrate the wild and beautiful places we love. Escape into the wild during these Wild Days of Summer.

The Wild Days of Summer are perfect for going on a hike, kayaking down a river or for doing nothing at all — just sitting and enjoying the beauty of the great outdoors. Whether you're exploring a new local park or vacationing in a new wild place you’ve never seen before, summer is a time for adventure.

Let us help you get started with your summer adventure with our Wild Days of Summer campaign.

Top experiences

From the icy blue Arctic waters to the rhododendron jungles of the Greater Smoky Mountains, we've got a list of top places and top activities in the wild that you won't want to miss.

Adopt your wild place

As Americans, we own a system of protected wildlands envied the world over. But these lands are far from safe — many face daily threats due to human use and development and natural threats like climate change.

Whether your favorite wild place is a cool New England forest or a red rock canyon in the southwest, they have something in common — they need your help.

Protect wilderness today by adopting one of these seven important landscapes:

Get the mywilderness Campfire Cookbook

Wilderness Society supporters shared their secrets for cooking up delicious meals around the campfire last year, and now the best of the best have been compiled in this ultimate recipe book for the GORP-loving gourmet. Get your complete copy.

  • Michael Reinemer

    The Wilderness Society praises Congress for passing the Hill Creek Cultural Preservation and Energy Development Act (H.R. 356 / S. 27). The legislation provides for the exchange of roughly 20,000 acres of Utah’s mineral rights from ecologically and culturally sensitive lands in the Desolation Canyon region of the Uintah and Ouray Reservation for federal mineral rights in another part of the reservation.

  • Michael Reinemer

    The draft House Interior and Environment Appropriations bill released today is a clear improvement from previous years, though it still misses the mark on several key conservation, climate and public lands needs and is laden with numerous policy provisions or “riders” that have no place in the appropriations process.

  • Michael Reinemer

    On Wednesday, The Wilderness Society presented lifetime conservation achievement awards to Representatives George Miller, Jim Moran and Rush Holt, who collectively represent 80 years of support for conservation of some of America’s most stunning landscapes and protection of the country’s clean air and water.  All three members of Congress have announced their plans to retire at the end of the current session.

    Rep. George Miller (California – 11th District)