Wild Places

The United States has one of the richest wildland systems in the world. There are plenty of national parks and forests, wilderness study areas and wildlife refuges for you to experience and enjoy.

Our nation has a more than 100-year legacy of working to protect wildlands so they exist for future generations to experience and enjoy. While the United States may be a world leader in protecting wilderness, there is still much work to be done.

Every wildland deserves care — and many are under-protected. At Wilderness, we have been working since 1935 to complete a system of protected wildlands in the United States. This includes officially designated wilderness and other public land designations.

Today we focus on 10 wild places that are critical to completing that system.

Alaska and the Arctic

From the ancient old-growth spruce in the Tongass National Forest to the Arctic Coastal Plain, Alaska is one of the world’s greatest wild places to visit.

California

From stunning Sierra forests to vast desert vistas, California has spectacular wildlands, many within a short drive from Los Angeles and other major urban centers.

Colorado Plateau

The Colorado Plateau is one of the last remnants of the wild west. This wild, untamed area covers parts of Arizona, Utah, Colorado, New Mexico and Wyoming.

Crown of the Continent

The Crown of the Continent in Montana’s Rocky Mountains is just as wild today as when Lewis and Clark traveled it more than 200 years ago.

North Cascades

The North Cascades is a rugged landscape stretching 13 million acres of wild country in Washington state, from the Canadian border to the foothills of Mt. Rainier.

Northern Forest

The Northern Forest, which stretches across New England, is known for its breath-taking scenery, abundant wildlife and world-class recreation. It is one of America’s greatest natural treasures.

Southern Appalachians

With its cool waterfalls, serene woods and brilliant wildflowers, the wild forests of the Southern Appalachians draw thousands of visitors each year.

Other places we work

In addition to the seven key landscapes listed, The Wilderness Society also works on important wilderness issues in:

  • cate tanenbaum

    Wilderness Society applauds House for moving beyond ‘gridlock’ but says new amendments lead legislation astray

    The Wilderness Society today praised the House Natural Resources Comamittee for advancing Wilderness designations for Washington state and Nevada but worries House legislation departs too significantly from more locally supported counterpart bills in the Senate. 

  • Neil Shader

    The following statement can be attributed to Chase Huntley, senior government relation director for The Wilderness Society. Chase was invited to testify before the House Natural Resources Committee Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources on H.R. 596 and H.R. 1363.

  • Neil Shader

    The first is the “Advancing Conservation and Education Act of 2014,” from Rep. Rob Bishop (Utah) and Rep. Peter DeFazio (Oregon), which would expedite transfers of land between states and federal agencies.