Wild Places

The United States has one of the richest wildland systems in the world. There are plenty of national parks and forests, wilderness study areas and wildlife refuges for you to experience and enjoy.

Our nation has a more than 100-year legacy of working to protect wildlands so they exist for future generations to experience and enjoy. While the United States may be a world leader in protecting wilderness, there is still much work to be done.

Every wildland deserves care — and many are under-protected. At Wilderness, we have been working since 1935 to complete a system of protected wildlands in the United States. This includes officially designated wilderness and other public land designations.

Today we focus on 10 wild places that are critical to completing that system.

Alaska and the Arctic

From the ancient old-growth spruce in the Tongass National Forest to the Arctic Coastal Plain, Alaska is one of the world’s greatest wild places to visit.

California

From stunning Sierra forests to vast desert vistas, California has spectacular wildlands, many within a short drive from Los Angeles and other major urban centers.

Colorado Plateau

The Colorado Plateau is one of the last remnants of the wild west. This wild, untamed area covers parts of Arizona, Utah, Colorado, New Mexico and Wyoming.

Crown of the Continent

The Crown of the Continent in Montana’s Rocky Mountains is just as wild today as when Lewis and Clark traveled it more than 200 years ago.

North Cascades

The North Cascades is a rugged landscape stretching 13 million acres of wild country in Washington state, from the Canadian border to the foothills of Mt. Rainier.

Northern Forest

The Northern Forest, which stretches across New England, is known for its breath-taking scenery, abundant wildlife and world-class recreation. It is one of America’s greatest natural treasures.

Southern Appalachians

With its cool waterfalls, serene woods and brilliant wildflowers, the wild forests of the Southern Appalachians draw thousands of visitors each year.

Other places we work

In addition to the seven key landscapes listed, The Wilderness Society also works on important wilderness issues in:

  • Every year, a coalition of conservation and environmental groups produce a report to help Congress as it debates the federal budget for the year. This report, has typically been to referred to as the "Green Budget." This year, it is titled "Green Investments," and it illustrates the importance of reinvesting in conservation and natural resources programs for Fiscal Year 2015 by looking at some of the effects of recent budget cuts. 

  • The Honorable Doc Hastings, Chairman
    U.S. House Committee on Natural Resources
    1324 Longworth House Office Building
    Washington, DC 20515
     
    The Honorable Peter DeFazio, Ranking Member
    U.S. House Committee on Natural Resources
    1324 Longworth House Building
    Washington, DC 20515
     
    Dear Chairman Hastings, Ranking Member DeFazio and Members of the Committee:
     
  • These comments were submitted by The Wilderness Society and our partners on the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the TransWest Express Transmission Line. The proposed TransWest Express Transmission Project would deliver renewable energy produced in Wyoming to the Desert Southwest region, and would traverse Wyoming, Colorado, Utah, and Nevada along its 725-mile route.