Wilderness Under Siege

A wave of harmful bills in Congress is putting half a billion acres of wilderness at risk. You can help stop this great outdoors giveaway.

It has been nearly 50 years since Congress passed the landmark 1964 Wilderness Act. Now, a series of threatening bills is putting this act — and our beloved wildlands — at risk.

This “great outdoors giveaway” threatens more than a half billion acres of wildlands. It also threatens the clean air, clean water and local economies they support.

Our wildlands are a great source of economic activity, especially in rural communities. Outdoor recreation, natural resource conservation and historic preservation activities contribute more than $1 trillion annually to our economy. These activities support 9.4 million jobs and generate more than $100 billion in federal, state and local taxes. The Wilderness Under Siege bills would hurt communities that need this economic support the most.

A new bipartisan survey sponsored by Colorado College found that people of all backgrounds want to keep wildlands out of harm’s way. Regardless of their political views, survey respondents did not want to see wildlands put in the hands of developers.

Interactive map

Our interactive map gives a state-by-state breakdown of the harmful legislation in Congress that threatens our wild places.

If you can’t view the map, you can use our text-based version.

Take action

You can tell Congress to stop legislation that threatens wilderness and to say “no” to giving away your wild lands. Sign the petition.

Full Report

You can learn more about the harmful bills featured in our Wilderness Under Siege report.

 

  • Michael Reinemer

    The Wilderness Society praises Congress for passing the Hill Creek Cultural Preservation and Energy Development Act (H.R. 356 / S. 27). The legislation provides for the exchange of roughly 20,000 acres of Utah’s mineral rights from ecologically and culturally sensitive lands in the Desolation Canyon region of the Uintah and Ouray Reservation for federal mineral rights in another part of the reservation.

  • Michael Reinemer

    The draft House Interior and Environment Appropriations bill released today is a clear improvement from previous years, though it still misses the mark on several key conservation, climate and public lands needs and is laden with numerous policy provisions or “riders” that have no place in the appropriations process.

  • Michael Reinemer

    On Wednesday, The Wilderness Society presented lifetime conservation achievement awards to Representatives George Miller, Jim Moran and Rush Holt, who collectively represent 80 years of support for conservation of some of America’s most stunning landscapes and protection of the country’s clean air and water.  All three members of Congress have announced their plans to retire at the end of the current session.

    Rep. George Miller (California – 11th District)