Wilderness Under Siege

A wave of harmful bills in Congress is putting half a billion acres of wilderness at risk. You can help stop this great outdoors giveaway.

It has been nearly 50 years since Congress passed the landmark 1964 Wilderness Act. Now, a series of threatening bills is putting this act — and our beloved wildlands — at risk.

This “great outdoors giveaway” threatens more than a half billion acres of wildlands. It also threatens the clean air, clean water and local economies they support.

Our wildlands are a great source of economic activity, especially in rural communities. Outdoor recreation, natural resource conservation and historic preservation activities contribute more than $1 trillion annually to our economy. These activities support 9.4 million jobs and generate more than $100 billion in federal, state and local taxes. The Wilderness Under Siege bills would hurt communities that need this economic support the most.

A new bipartisan survey sponsored by Colorado College found that people of all backgrounds want to keep wildlands out of harm’s way. Regardless of their political views, survey respondents did not want to see wildlands put in the hands of developers.

Interactive map

Our interactive map gives a state-by-state breakdown of the harmful legislation in Congress that threatens our wild places.

If you can’t view the map, you can use our text-based version.

Take action

You can tell Congress to stop legislation that threatens wilderness and to say “no” to giving away your wild lands. Sign the petition.

Full Report

You can learn more about the harmful bills featured in our Wilderness Under Siege report.

 

  • Jennifer Dickson

    Despite major risks, obstacles and climate change concerns, the proposed plan would allow drilling for oil and gas in this remote, fragile and rapidly warming environment.

    The proposed Chukchi and Beaufort sea lease sales exclude relatively small areas where leasing would be prohibited.

  • Michael Reinemer

    The following statement is from Sally Miller, senior regional conservation representative with The Wilderness Society, regarding Representative Paul Cook’s introduction of legislation to create the Alabama Hills National Scenic Area and include it in the Bureau of Land Management’s system of National Conservation Lands:

  • Michael Reinemer

    Senators Mike Crapo, R-Idaho, and Ron Wyden, D-Ore., introduced the bill along with Republican Senators James Risch of Idaho, Cory Gardner of Colorado and Steve Daines of Montana as well as Democratic Senators Michael Bennet of Colorado, Tammy Baldwin of Wisconsin and Maria Cantwell of Washington.

    The bill would change how the federal government budgets for the suppression of wildfire disasters, to make it similar to the way other disasters are funded.