Wilderness Under Siege

A wave of harmful bills in Congress is putting half a billion acres of wilderness at risk. You can help stop this great outdoors giveaway.

It has been nearly 50 years since Congress passed the landmark 1964 Wilderness Act. Now, a series of threatening bills is putting this act — and our beloved wildlands — at risk.

This “great outdoors giveaway” threatens more than a half billion acres of wildlands. It also threatens the clean air, clean water and local economies they support.

Our wildlands are a great source of economic activity, especially in rural communities. Outdoor recreation, natural resource conservation and historic preservation activities contribute more than $1 trillion annually to our economy. These activities support 9.4 million jobs and generate more than $100 billion in federal, state and local taxes. The Wilderness Under Siege bills would hurt communities that need this economic support the most.

A new bipartisan survey sponsored by Colorado College found that people of all backgrounds want to keep wildlands out of harm’s way. Regardless of their political views, survey respondents did not want to see wildlands put in the hands of developers.

Interactive map

Our interactive map gives a state-by-state breakdown of the harmful legislation in Congress that threatens our wild places.

If you can’t view the map, you can use our text-based version.

Take action

You can tell Congress to stop legislation that threatens wilderness and to say “no” to giving away your wild lands. Sign the petition.

Full Report

You can learn more about the harmful bills featured in our Wilderness Under Siege report.

 

  • Every year, a coalition of conservation and environmental groups produce a report to help Congress as it debates the federal budget for the year. This report, has typically been to referred to as the "Green Budget." This year, it is titled "Green Investments," and it illustrates the importance of reinvesting in conservation and natural resources programs for Fiscal Year 2015 by looking at some of the effects of recent budget cuts. 

  • The Honorable Doc Hastings, Chairman
    U.S. House Committee on Natural Resources
    1324 Longworth House Office Building
    Washington, DC 20515
     
    The Honorable Peter DeFazio, Ranking Member
    U.S. House Committee on Natural Resources
    1324 Longworth House Building
    Washington, DC 20515
     
    Dear Chairman Hastings, Ranking Member DeFazio and Members of the Committee:
     
  • These comments were submitted by The Wilderness Society and our partners on the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the TransWest Express Transmission Line. The proposed TransWest Express Transmission Project would deliver renewable energy produced in Wyoming to the Desert Southwest region, and would traverse Wyoming, Colorado, Utah, and Nevada along its 725-mile route.