Wyoming Range

The Wyoming Range is an isolated range of peaks rising up from sloping foothills and vast sagebrush plains that runs for about eighty miles in a north-south direction.

In western Wyoming, south of Jackson Hole and Grand Teton National Park, the Wyoming Range is an isolated range of peaks rising up from sloping foothills and vast sagebrush plains that runs for about eighty miles in a north-south direction. The Wyoming Range is popular for a variety of reasons, but especially for its impressive big-game populations, which include some of the densest populations of mule deer in the state, four elk herds and half the state's moose.

Why the Wyoming Range

The mountains of the Wyoming Range are too special to drill, yet their world-class recreation, wildlife and water resources are threatened by proposed oil and gas development.

Work we are doing

At Wilderness, we're working to protect the world-class wildlife and recreation resources of the Wyoming Range from reckless oil and gas drilling.

Our partners

At Wilderness, we are working with local coalition partners to steer oil and gas drilling away from the most sensitive wildlands and to expire leases that could contribute to more drilling and more contamination of this vulnerable place.

  • Michael Reinemer

    Strayed will receive the We Are the Wild Inspiration Award, which recognizes a person who embodies the spirit of wilderness and its transformative power.

    Jamie Williams, president of The Wilderness Society, said, “In this 50th anniversary year of the Wilderness Act, we present this award to underscore the importance of inspiring people to discover and care for our wild lands. Today we honor Cheryl Strayed for her remarkable story and for inspiring new generations to experience wilderness, which forms the backbone of the American spirit.”

  • Michael Reinemer

    President Obama will use his executive authority to create the San Gabriel Mountains National Monument, an action that will improve outdoor recreation, safeguard vital water supplies and protect wildlife in the backyard of Los Angeles – the nation’s most populous county.

  • Michael Reinemer

    The Wilderness Society applauds the Obama Administration for advancing bipartisan efforts to further protect ocean ecosystems and their scientific value by using the Antiquities Act to expand the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument, an undisturbed island and atoll chain located 1,000 miles southwest of Hawaii. The proclamation builds on the approximately 83,000 square-mile national monument initially designated by President George W. Bush in 2009.