Wyoming Range

The Wyoming Range is an isolated range of peaks rising up from sloping foothills and vast sagebrush plains that runs for about eighty miles in a north-south direction.

In western Wyoming, south of Jackson Hole and Grand Teton National Park, the Wyoming Range is an isolated range of peaks rising up from sloping foothills and vast sagebrush plains that runs for about eighty miles in a north-south direction. The Wyoming Range is popular for a variety of reasons, but especially for its impressive big-game populations, which include some of the densest populations of mule deer in the state, four elk herds and half the state's moose.

Why the Wyoming Range

The mountains of the Wyoming Range are too special to drill, yet their world-class recreation, wildlife and water resources are threatened by proposed oil and gas development.

Work we are doing

At Wilderness, we're working to protect the world-class wildlife and recreation resources of the Wyoming Range from reckless oil and gas drilling.

Our partners

At Wilderness, we are working with local coalition partners to steer oil and gas drilling away from the most sensitive wildlands and to expire leases that could contribute to more drilling and more contamination of this vulnerable place.

  • Jennifer Dickson

    During its history, the state of Idaho has sold off more than 1.7 million acres of land to private interests, according to an analysis of land sale data by The Wilderness Society released this week.

  • Michael Reinemer

    On Bureau of Land Management (BLM) lands and National Forests, the agencies are mismanaging the use of off-road vehicles (ORVs) such as dirt bikes, snowmobiles, and all-terrain vehicles, resulting in unnecessary damage to watersheds and wildlife, and conflict with other recreationists. This is in spite of a long-standing legal obligation dating back to the 1970s that requires federal land agencies to minimize such damage and conflict.

  • Michael Reinemer

    Development of natural areas in the United States, coupled with expected changes in climate, have increased the importance of migration corridors that connect protected natural areas. Large, connected wild lands reduce the isolation of animal and plant populations and allow for migration and movement that can help preserve populations of wild species and enhance genetic and ecosystem diversity.