You Can Help

Every voice matters in the fight to protect America’s last remaining wildlands — and one determined person can make a huge difference.

Add your voice to the to the community of dedicated wilderness lovers working to protect our wildlands. There are many ways you can join The Wilderness Society in preserving our nation's wild heritage.

Take action

We have a growing, committed network of activists who lend their voices to important wilderness issues. Join our network and take action on national and local issues affecting our wildlands.

Make a donation

There is one thing that enables us to continue our work to protect our nation's old-growth forests, Arctic wildlands and western canyons — you. Your tax deductible donation will help us protect iconic American wildlands for generations to come.

When you make a donation of $35 or more, you become a Wilderness Society member. Learn more about membership.

Become a monthly donor

When you become a monthly donor, you show a passionate commitment to protecting America's wildlands. Our monthly donors are an important part of our network of members and supporters committed to keeping our wildlands wild.

Planned giving

Planned giving allows you to give through a variety of means, including giving through your will, giving through life insurance and giving real estate.

Give in honor or memory

When you give a gift to The Wilderness Society in honor of someone you care about, you help to create a legacy of living wilderness.

Other ways to give

Learn about other ways you can help protect wilderness by giving to The Wilderness Society.

 

  • Neil Shader

    A report on landscape-based mitigation released by the Interior Department Energy and Climate Change Task Force, “A Strategy for Improving the Mitigation Policies and Practices of The Department of the Interior,”  provides a blueprint for better protection for fish, wildlife, recreation and wild land values for the tens of millions of acres of public lands open to oil and gas and other energy development.

  • Michael Reinemer

    This weekend, veterans from around the West will be visiting the rolling, boulder-strewn landscape of the Dragoon Mountains south of Tucson to participate in a writing workshop that will guide them on skills needed to create narratives of fiction, non-fiction, or poetry that is informed both by their service experiences and the natural environment.

  • Neil Shader

    The following statement on the confirmation of Neil Kornze to be the Director of the Bureau of Land Management can be attributed to Jamie Williams, president of The Wilderness Society.