You Can Help

Every voice matters in the fight to protect America’s last remaining wildlands — and one determined person can make a huge difference.

Add your voice to the to the community of dedicated wilderness lovers working to protect our wildlands. There are many ways you can join The Wilderness Society in preserving our nation's wild heritage.

Take action

We have a growing, committed network of activists who lend their voices to important wilderness issues. Join our network and take action on national and local issues affecting our wildlands.

Make a donation

There is one thing that enables us to continue our work to protect our nation's old-growth forests, Arctic wildlands and western canyons — you. Your tax deductible donation will help us protect iconic American wildlands for generations to come.

When you make a donation of $35 or more, you become a Wilderness Society member. Learn more about membership.

Become a monthly donor

When you become a monthly donor, you show a passionate commitment to protecting America's wildlands. Our monthly donors are an important part of our network of members and supporters committed to keeping our wildlands wild.

Planned giving

Planned giving allows you to give through a variety of means, including giving through your will, giving through life insurance and giving real estate.

Give in honor or memory

When you give a gift to The Wilderness Society in honor of someone you care about, you help to create a legacy of living wilderness.

Other ways to give

Learn about other ways you can help protect wilderness by giving to The Wilderness Society.

 

  • Michael Reinemer

    Senator Cantwell, the ranking member of the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee, has scheduled a hearing in Seattle on August 27 to examine wildfire issues.  Senator John Barrasso, who chairs that committee’s Public Lands, Forests and Mining subcommittee, is also scheduled to participate in the hearing.

  • Tim Woody

    When President Obama visits Alaska at the end of August, climate change will be a key focus of his trip. The Wilderness Society developed the following memo to provide a brief primer on key Alaska public lands where the effects of climate change can already be seen. This information is intended to ease your research and inform your reporting during the president’s visit. It focuses on four areas where the president’s administration has made major, important decisions:

  • Anastasia Greene

    “We are heartened to see that President Obama is focusing on clean energy as part of building an enduring environmental legacy in the last 18 months of his presidency, and the Clean Power Plan is a good start,” said Jamie Williams, president of the Wilderness Society, one of the oldest conservation groups in the United States. "This administration has shifted the role our public lands play in powering the nation. We have solar projects on public lands for the first time ever.