You Can Help

Every voice matters in the fight to protect America’s last remaining wildlands — and one determined person can make a huge difference.

Add your voice to the community of dedicated wilderness lovers working to protect our wildlands. There are many ways you can join The Wilderness Society in preserving our nation's wild heritage.

Take action

We have a growing, committed network of activists who lend their voices to important wilderness issues. Join our network and take action on national and local issues affecting our wildlands.

Make a donation

There is one thing that enables us to continue our work to protect our nation's old-growth forests, Arctic wildlands and western canyons — you. Your tax deductible donation will help us protect iconic American wildlands for generations to come.

When you make a donation of $35 or more, you become a Wilderness Society member. Learn more about membership.

Become a monthly donor

When you become a monthly donor, you show a passionate commitment to protecting America's wildlands. Our monthly donors are an important part of our network of members and supporters committed to keeping our wildlands wild.

Planned giving

Planned giving allows you to give through a variety of means, including giving through your will, giving through life insurance and giving real estate.

Give in honor or memory

When you give a gift to The Wilderness Society in honor of someone you care about, you help to create a legacy of living wilderness.

Other ways to give

Learn about other ways you can help protect wilderness by giving to The Wilderness Society.

 

  • Michael Reinemer

    Rather than using taxpayer dollars, the program’s funds come from a small slice of royalties from oil and gas leases in publicly owned offshore waters. 

    The 2017 budget would invest $900 million for conservation and recreation projects, which is the annual amount authorized by the 1964 bill that created this popular program. However, actual funding approved by Congress has traditionally fallen far short of that amount. 

    Alan Rowsome at The Wilderness Society commented:

  • Anonymous

    “The proposed guidelines from the Bureau of Land Management governing natural gas waste are a huge step forward toward ensuring public resources on federal lands are used for Americans’ benefit, and not wasted.

    “For too long, oil and gas companies have been able to vent and flare unlimited quantities of natural gas and ignore massive leaks from outdated infrastructure. These unregulated actions have immense consequences for American taxpayers, who lose out on more than $330 million annually from gas that is not being sold.

  • Jennifer Dickson

    The 2016 Utah Public Lands Initiative (PLI) draft released by Utah Representative Rob Bishop fails to provide adequate protections for scenic public lands in the state, would undermine bedrock environmental laws and threatens to despoil key public lands.