You Can Help

Every voice matters in the fight to protect America’s last remaining wildlands — and one determined person can make a huge difference.

Add your voice to the community of dedicated wilderness lovers working to protect our wildlands. There are many ways you can join The Wilderness Society in preserving our nation's wild heritage.

Take action

We have a growing, committed network of activists who lend their voices to important wilderness issues. Join our network and take action on national and local issues affecting our wildlands.

Make a donation

There is one thing that enables us to continue our work to protect our nation's old-growth forests, Arctic wildlands and western canyons — you. Your tax deductible donation will help us protect iconic American wildlands for generations to come.

When you make a donation of $35 or more, you become a Wilderness Society member. Learn more about membership.

Become a monthly donor

When you become a monthly donor, you show a passionate commitment to protecting America's wildlands. Our monthly donors are an important part of our network of members and supporters committed to keeping our wildlands wild.

Planned giving

Planned giving allows you to give through a variety of means, including giving through your will, giving through life insurance and giving real estate.

Give in honor or memory

When you give a gift to The Wilderness Society in honor of someone you care about, you help to create a legacy of living wilderness.

Partner with us

We look for opportunities to partner with companies who share our values and our commitment to protecting wild places and inspiring Americans to care for them.

Other ways to give

Learn about other ways you can help protect wilderness by giving to The Wilderness Society.

 

  • The 115th Congress faces a multitude of environmental challenges. The Wilderness Society is working the halls of power to make sure that America's wild places are part of the legislative agenda, and to make sure that lawmakers and staff are hearing both sides of the issues.

  • Map and infographics showing the region of the plan, what matters in the Pacific Northwestt (1), what people want in a Northwest Forest Plan (2) and what most voters support in a revised Northwest Forest plan (3). A two page summary of the polls results is below the map and infographics.

  • statewide survey of 600 registered voters in Washington, Oregon and California, with an additional oversample of 200 registered voters in California counties, was conducted by telephone using professional interviewers, including 45% of all interviews conducted via cell phone.