Youth Recreation

For kids, wilderness is a natural playground that provides exercise and emotional well-being. Yet, America’s youth are spending less and less time outdoors.

Through our youth recreation program, we’re making sure that America’s kids experience wilderness first-hand.

Why get youth outside?

America’s children are spending less time outside than ever before. We see the consequences in their health, in classrooms and on neglected lands. Youth recreation can help restore our youth and our lands, and make both healthier and more resilient.

Youth organizations on national forests

Many national forests are near urban areas, making them the perfect place to get city kids outdoors. Yet organizations that provide outdoor experiences for youth find that they are often unable to use national forests because of U.S. Forest Service rules.

Youth recreation partnerships

Diverse and non-traditional allies are all coming together to get our kids outside. Whether it is First Lady Michelle Obama’s “Let’s Move!” and President Obama’s America’s Great Outdoors initiative or the YMCA and REI, people everywhere are recognizing that we desperately need to reconnect kids with nature.

 

Photo courtesy of Flikr creative commons: Eva Cristescu

  • Anastasia Greene

    “We are disappointed to see that the President-elect has appointed a climate science skeptic who has pledged to rollback greenhouse gas reduction measures. Our nation faces unprecedented challenges from human-caused climate change, including our national parks and communities most vulnerable to drought, flooding and other effects.

  • Michael Reinemer

    As leaders of the U.S. environmental movement, we are mothers and fathers, daughters and sons, white, black, Latino, Asian, Native American, of many creeds, faiths and religions. We come from diverse backgrounds and near infinite preferences and beliefs. But above all, we are concerned individuals and concerned members of the human race.

  • Michael Reinemer
    “Today’s decision to halt the Dakota Access Pipeline and to call for a full environmental review of alternative routes is welcome and positive news,” said Jamie Williams, president of The Wilderness Society. “The Army Corps of Engineers is right to recognize that Native nations were not meaningfully consulted on a project with such high risks to their sovereign lands and drinking water.