Youth Recreation

For kids, wilderness is a natural playground that provides exercise and emotional well-being. Yet, America’s youth are spending less and less time outdoors.

Through our youth recreation program, we’re making sure that America’s kids experience wilderness first-hand.

Why get youth outside?

America’s children are spending less time outside than ever before. We see the consequences in their health, in classrooms and on neglected lands. Youth recreation can help restore our youth and our lands, and make both healthier and more resilient.

Youth organizations on national forests

Many national forests are near urban areas, making them the perfect place to get city kids outdoors. Yet organizations that provide outdoor experiences for youth find that they are often unable to use national forests because of U.S. Forest Service rules.

Youth recreation partnerships

Diverse and non-traditional allies are all coming together to get our kids outside. Whether it is First Lady Michelle Obama’s “Let’s Move!” and President Obama’s America’s Great Outdoors initiative or the YMCA and REI, people everywhere are recognizing that we desperately need to reconnect kids with nature.

 

Photo courtesy of Flikr creative commons: Eva Cristescu

  • DJ Tyson

    Today, Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke addressed a meeting of the Western Governors Association in Montana. In response, Nada Culver, senior director of agency policy at The Wilderness Society said:

  • Michael Reinemer

    ANCHORAGE, ALASKA (June 27, 2017) – Today the U.S. House Committee on Natural Resources voted in favor of H.R. 218, a bill that would allow construction of an unnecessary road through a designated wilderness area in Alaska’s Izembek National Wildlife Refuge. In response, The Wilderness Society issues the following statement from Alaska Regional Director Nicole Whittington-Evans:

  • Kate Mackay

    Today the House Natural Resources Committee marked up and passed H.R. 2936, the “Resilient Federal Forests Act of 2017,” which opens America’s national forests and roadless areas to expedited logging—a direct attack on the nation’s last old growth stands, clean drinking water for millions and quiet habitat for wildlife.