Youth Recreation

For kids, wilderness is a natural playground that provides exercise and emotional well-being. Yet, America’s youth are spending less and less time outdoors.

Through our youth recreation program, we’re making sure that America’s kids experience wilderness first-hand.

Why get youth outside?

America’s children are spending less time outside than ever before. We see the consequences in their health, in classrooms and on neglected lands. Youth recreation can help restore our youth and our lands, and make both healthier and more resilient.

Youth organizations on national forests

Many national forests are near urban areas, making them the perfect place to get city kids outdoors. Yet organizations that provide outdoor experiences for youth find that they are often unable to use national forests because of U.S. Forest Service rules.

Youth recreation partnerships

Diverse and non-traditional allies are all coming together to get our kids outside. Whether it is First Lady Michelle Obama’s “Let’s Move!” and President Obama’s America’s Great Outdoors initiative or the YMCA and REI, people everywhere are recognizing that we desperately need to reconnect kids with nature.

 

Photo courtesy of Flikr creative commons: Eva Cristescu

  • In this report, we provide the policy framework for designating ORV trails and areas on federal lands, along with a series of recommendations based on recent case law and ten case studies from the Forest Service, BLM, and National Park Service that demonstrate both agency failures to comply with the executive order minimization criteria and good planning practices that could be incorporated into a model for application of the criteria.
  • Chart of offshore oil well blowout incident rates illustrates the need for stronger federal regulations to improve human safety and decrease environmental risk.

  • This fourth in a series of Easy to Start, Impossible to Finish reports analyzes four major transportation and energy projects in the planning stages in the state of Alaska. Alaska Gov. Bill Walker stopped discretionary spending on these four projects–the proposed Ambler Road in the Arctic Interior, Juneau Access, the Knik Arm Bridge and the Susitna-Watana Dam–soon after he took office in 2014. During 2015, Gov. Walker reversed course and allowed these projects to continue spending money on studies.