Blog

  • Getting outside the beltway is always a pleasure for someone who makes a living protecting America’s wild and beautiful places. It’s doubly rewarding when you have a chance to share an award with a government official and meet all kinds of people committed to the cause of conservation.

  • Coming from Argentina as an intern to The Wilderness Society, I was recently asked this question while getting familiar with the work: Do you know who is in charge of managing most of the federal lands in the United States?

  • If you think today’s youth are up to no good, you obviously haven’t been at Newhalem Crags in the North Cascades National Park recently. A group of 8 young climbers and 16 others volunteered a coveted Saturday in September to build an access path to the Crags in Washington.

  • It’s one of the most difficult environmental concepts to understand, yet the word is starting to get out: some fires are good things. A look at a recent poll conducted by a coalition headed by The Wilderness Society and The Nature Conservancy revealed that the American public better understands that fire, under the right conditions, helps restore forests and protect communities and firefighters alike.

  • Right now, a sweeping and long-awaited package of bills that would conserve hundreds of thousands of acres of new Wilderness and other special public lands is working its way through Congress. If passed, the omnibus lands act, would provide the greatest expansion of the National Wilderness Preservation System in 14 years.

    So much work has gone into making these wilderness-friendly bills a reality, but with the end of the legislative year, many larger, controversial national issues have taken attention away from passing the legislation.

  • Stand at the edge of Island in the Sky in Canyonlands National Park near Moab, Utah, and be prepared to be swept away by a landscape of redrock badlands and canyon country.

    This extraordinary national park, with its enormous views and unique geologic features, is largely managed by the Bureau of Land Management – and unfortunately the BLM is making some very disconcerting decisions about this precious part of south-eastern Utah.

  • In New Mexico’s Santa Fe National Forest you’ll find one of the most heavily roaded forests in the southwest. More than 4,470 miles of road braid across its landscape—enough to take you from Santa Fe to Reykjavik, Iceland.

    If loads of roads weren’t what you were expecting to find in a national forest, you’ll be happy to know that the forest may soon see a return of roadless areas.

    Recently, the forest released an initial plan to close many miles of unnecessary, environmentally damaging roads across the forest.

  • Some places just deserve to be saved, and protection can't come soon enough for Gold Butte. It doesn't take long to realize you're in a spectacular place when visiting the Gold Butte region of Nevada. If the dramatic sandstone formations and red rock cliffs don't do it for you, surely the thousands of Native American petroglyphs and prehistoric sites will.

    The place commands the awe and respect of most travelers that meander through.

  • Quieter times will soon be upon the oldest national park in the country, thanks to a monumental decision last month by a federal court to throw out a Bush Administration decision to allow an excessive number of snowmobiles per day in the beloved park.

  • The unique wildlands and wildlife of the Izembek National Wildlife Refuge are threatened by a proposed road that would cut through its heart.

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