• In New Mexico’s Santa Fe National Forest you’ll find one of the most heavily roaded forests in the southwest. More than 4,470 miles of road braid across its landscape—enough to take you from Santa Fe to Reykjavik, Iceland.

    If loads of roads weren’t what you were expecting to find in a national forest, you’ll be happy to know that the forest may soon see a return of roadless areas.

    Recently, the forest released an initial plan to close many miles of unnecessary, environmentally damaging roads across the forest.

  • Some places just deserve to be saved, and protection can't come soon enough for Gold Butte. It doesn't take long to realize you're in a spectacular place when visiting the Gold Butte region of Nevada. If the dramatic sandstone formations and red rock cliffs don't do it for you, surely the thousands of Native American petroglyphs and prehistoric sites will.

    The place commands the awe and respect of most travelers that meander through.

  • Quieter times will soon be upon the oldest national park in the country, thanks to a monumental decision last month by a federal court to throw out a Bush Administration decision to allow an excessive number of snowmobiles per day in the beloved park.

  • The unique wildlands and wildlife of the Izembek National Wildlife Refuge are threatened by a proposed road that would cut through its heart.

  • A coalition of more than 80 nonprofit conservation and other organizations, led by the Wilderness Society, is optimistic that Congress will soon pass bipartisan-backed legislation creating America’s newest conservation system — the National Landscape Conservation System.

    The system of more than 26 million acres of mountains, streams, rivers, trails and historic sites could be approved as part of the The Omnibus Public Land Management Act that the Senate may consider during a lame duck session in November.

  • Energy development and off-road vehicle abuse in five Utah National Park's endanger clean air and rich history.

    The Wilderness Society held a teleconference to discuss the fate of 11 million acres of Utah redrock canyon country, one of the most iconic landscapes in North America.

    The Bush administration’s decision to skew the management of these lands to narrowly benefit the oil and natural gas industry and off-road vehicle users was a central focus.