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  • Our victory on New Mexico's Otero Mesa this week took a turn for the pithy in the U.S. 10th Circuit Court of Appeals' decision rejecting the Bureau of Land Management's drilling scheme for the mesa.

    If you're not familiar with Otero Mesa, it occupies a blank spot on the map between Las Cruces and Carlsbad, and, at 1.2 million acres, it's the largest untouched Chihuahuan Desert grassland found anywhere in the United States.

  • Now that Congress has passed the Omnibus Public Land Management Act of 2009 (P.L. 111-11), federally protected Wilderness in the Izembek National Wildlife Refuge is in great peril. The bill would allow internationally significant Wilderness lands to be removed from federal protection in order to construct an unnecessary road between the Alaskan communities of King Cove and Cold Bay.

  • I spent last weekend birding the coastline of New Jersey. My partner in crime was Seth Cutright, a hawk counter at Sandy Hook Bird Observatory, just across the pond from New York City. After a hectic morning in which the air was alive with American kestrels and Northern harriers, the slowness of the afternoon prompted Seth’s generous supervisor to give him the rest of the day off.

    Seth and I did not waste a minute — off to Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge (a.k.a. Brigantine, or simply Brig, to locals) we went.

  • Like any boomer, I’ve spent some special moments with Disney. I loved "Davy Crockett," Spin and Marty, and the Mouseketeers.

    I just spent part of my Earth Day with Disney, watching the Washington premier of "Earth," the first of five films in the Disneynature series.

  • Star power can certainly help raise awareness of a critical issue. Like it or not, human beings are social animals and few among us are immune to the bit of a thrill that comes with rubbing elbows with celebrities. Even members of Congress get caught up in the excitement.

  • If you thought it was fun deciphering big game tracks on your last trip to the wild, you’re going to love this. A guided tour of dinosaur tracks embedded in sandstone millions of years ago is part of the 3rd annual Amazing Earthfest this year around Kanab, Utah.

    The festival runs May 17 to 23 with events designed to celebrate the magnificent landscapes, diverse ecology, and cultural heritage of the Colorado Plateau.

  • We’ve been down this road before. When Exxon terminated the Colony Oil Shale Project in 1982, Americans living around the Piceance Basin near Parachute Creek, Colorado began referring to that day as Black Sunday due to the disastrous effects it had on their communities and livelihoods.

  • In honor of Earth Day, we asked our WildAlert subscribers what they do on an individual basis to combat climate change. We heard all kinds of great ideas from simple everyday efforts to major undertakings. Each day this week, we’ve been posting a sampling of those stories and tips. Check out today’s installation and leave a few ideas of your own!

    You can also check out our own staff’s tips for combating global warming here.

  • Earth Day is tomorrow! In honor of the big day, we asked our WildAlert subscribers what they do on an individual basis to combat climate change. We heard all kinds of great ideas from simple everyday efforts to major undertakings. Each day this week, we’ve been posting a sampling of those stories and tips. Check out today’s installation and come back tomorrow for more!

  • Here in the mid-Atlantic where I live, both the calendar and the things I see from my kitchen window confirm that spring has officially sprung. The cherry tree outside my house is decked in pale pink blossoms. The goldfinches at my feeders are changing their drab winter plumage to the bright yellow of breeding season. Daffodils are blooming in my front yard. Every morning, my blue car is coated with a fine pale-green dusting of tree pollen — the same stuff that tells my smarting eyes that spring is here. Soon the lilacs will bud and bloom. Butterflies will emerge from their cocoons.

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